SCANDAL! Not. NSA eavesdropping. Anything UNREASONABLE about that?

January 26, 2006

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I heard a talk show host on a liberal station the other day talk about the president’s lack of constitutional authority to conduct the NSA wiretaps of those connected with Al Qaeda or whose deets were found in the personal effects of a bad guy.
This host said they were reading from the fourth amendment. And they elucidated thusly, “t
he right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause
.”
The talk host then build their entire case upon this premise.

Notice anything amiss?
Here’s the way the fourt amendment
REALLY reads:
“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against
unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”
Makes a bit of a difference, doesn’t it? Once again I ask you: Is there anything UNREASONABLE about the searching (wiretapping) of people with connections to our enemy in time of war?
Here’s something else to chew on. When the pinheads tell you that warrantless searches are unprecendented and unconstitutional on their face, read them this list from National Review writer and former federal prosecutor,
Andrew McCarthy (whom I trying mightily to get on the show),

  1. Detain American citizens for investigative purposes without a warrant; Arrest American citizens, based on probable cause, without a warrant; Conduct a warrantless search of the person of an American citizen who has been detained, with or without a warrant;
  2. Conduct a warrantless search of the home of an American citizen in order to secure the premises while a warrant is being obtained;
  3. Conduct a warrantless search of, and seize, items belonging to American citizens that are displayed in plain view and that are obviously criminal or dangerous in nature;
  4. Conduct a warrantless search of anything belonging to an American citizen under exigent circumstances if considerations of public safety make obtaining a warrant impractical;
  5. Conduct a warrantless search of an American citizen’s home and belongings if another person, who has apparent authority over the premises, consents;
  6. Conduct a warrantless search of an American citizen’s car anytime there is probable cause to believe it contains contraband or any evidence of a crime;
  7. Conduct a warrantless search of any closed container inside the car of an American citizen if there is probable cause to search the car — regardless of whether there is probable cause to search the container itself;
  8. Conduct a warrantless search of any property apparently abandoned by an American citizen;
  9. Conduct a warrantless search of any property of an American citizen that has lawfully been seized in order to create an inventory and protect police from potential hazards or civil claims;
  10. Conduct a warrantless search — including a strip search — at the border of any American citizen entering or leaving the United States;
  11. Conduct a warrantless search at the border of the baggage and other property of any American citizen entering or leaving the United States;
  12. Conduct a warrantless search of any American citizen seeking to enter a public building;
  13. Conduct a warrantless search of random Americans at police checkpoints established for public-safety purposes (such as to detect and discourage drunk driving);
  14. Conduct warrantless monitoring of common areas frequented by American citizens;
  15. Conduct warrantless searches of American citizens and their vessels on the high seas;
  16. Conduct warrantless monitoring of any telephone call or conversation of an American citizen as long as one participant in the conversation has consented to the monitoring;
  17. Conduct warrantless searches of junkyards maintained by American citizens;
  18. Conduct warrantless searches of docks maintained by American citizens;
  19. Conduct warrantless searches of bars or nightclubs owned by American citizens to police underage drinking;
  20. Conduct warrantless searches of auto-repair shops operated by American citizens;
  21. Conduct warrantless searches of the books of American gem dealers in order to discourage traffic in stolen goods;
  22. Conduct warrantless drug screening of American citizens working in government, emergency services, the transportation industry, and nuclear plants;
  23. Conduct warrantless drug screening of American citizens who are school officials;
  24. Conduct warrantless drug screening of American citizens who are school students;
  25. Conduct warrantless searches of American citizens who are on bail, probation or parole.
Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com