Daily Archives: June 25, 2012

Savage Savaged by His Own Remarks in Comment, But It’s Censored for Being "Threatening"

The Portland Smirkury has a love affair with their favorite militant gay, Dan Savage. Savage is a writer of some repute with the leather chaps and pink boa crowd. His syndicated “Savage Love” weekly column dishes sex advice to the gay and lovelorn. The national new media is beginning to notice.
 
Savage is vile, in your face and disgusting. But the paper prints his stuff anyway, thinking Dan Savage brings their alt weekly a little street cred. Besides, his commentary is the yin to the paper’s classified ad yang.

When then-Commissioner Sam Adams asked the Seattle based Dan Savage for an endorsement for Mayor in 2008, Savage told Willamette Week, 

“Sam?” Savage said, when asked why he was endorsing Adams. “He’s a pole smoker like me. I’m like those old women voting for Hillary.”

Just the man to lecture the nation’s youth, no? Yes! Savage is lecturing the nation’s youth on suicide prevention and that’s why he came to the attention of Breitbart News when he recently uttered:

Savage had tweeted that GOProud, the conservative gay organization’s endorsement of Mitt Romney was wandering a little too far off the ideological plantation for his taste:

GOProud sent Savage their own message which you can find here.

Savage was also quoted in the Breitbart story as saying:

In 2006, Savage said that Green Party Senate candidate Carl Romanelli, who was running against Democrat Bob Casey (the eventual winner), “should be dragged behind a pickup truck until there’s nothing left but the rope.” Casey was so offended he refused Savage’s campaign donations.

It appears The Smirk can dish it out but can’t take it. Recently 5th Listener “Andy from Beaverton” decided to use one of Savage’s own lines in his comment on one of Savage’s stories.  

The paper censored it.

From: Andy from Beaverton
To: Victoria 
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 6:31 PM
Subject: I DID IT! I finally had a comment removed at the sMercury


I finally wrote something so offensive, they removed it.  So I just posted it once again.  What did I write?  I just posted a quote by Dan Savage to a Dan Savage article;  Savage “should be dragged behind a pickup truck until there’s nothing left but the rope”

SL Letter of the Day: Do Monogamous Gay Couples Exist?

Let’s count the minutes until they remove it.  Don’t they know it’s a Dan Savage quote?

 
Andy asked in a comment why he was censored when he was only quoting Savage. It produced this reply:

After some discussion among Merc editors, Andy, we decided that, lacking any context, suggesting that Savage be “dragged behind a pickup truck until there’s nothing left but the rope” was just plain threatening, whether or not it was a quote.

Then he asked for clarification but got none:

PM editors,
Your response is quite confusing. Are you saying that if I can provide context to Savage’s death threat against Carl Romanelli, that it would be allowed? Or are you saying that if I use any death threat, intimidation, harassment and/or homophobic slander by Savage it will be removed, regardless of context?

So disgusting and vile Savage can say anything in the Smirk, but if anyone quotes him that’s threatening. Please make a note of it and perhaps send a reminder to the Smirk that perhaps they should reconsider putting such a threatening columnist in the pages of their own paper.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Watch This Space for Arizona Immigration, ObamaCare and Stolen Valor Act Rulings from US Supreme Court

MIXED RULING ON ARIZONA IMMIGRATION LAW.  BACK IN A MINUTE. PART UPHELD 2 B: COPS CAN CHECK TO SEE IF SOMEONE IS ILLEGALLY IN UNITED STATES.
Here’s the ruling: http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/11pdf/11-182b5e1.pdf

SO FAR SCOTUS HAS RULED THERE CAN BE NO LIFE SENTENCES FOR MINORS WHO COMMITTED MURDER

SCOTUSBLOG LIVEBLOGGING HERE.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Rees Lloyd: LIBERTY MILESTONE: June 25, 1950 –The Korean War begins:

            June 25, 2012, is the 59th  anniversary of the commencement of the Korean War, often characterized as the “Forgotten War.” It is important, however, to remember, rather than forget, the Korean War,  and the Americans who fought it.

            The Korean War began on June 25, 1950, when North Korea, under the communist dictator  Kim Il Sung, invaded the Republic of South Korea by sending more than 200,000 troops across the 38thParallel which divided North from South. Supported by the communist dictators Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union and Mao Zedong of Red China,  Kim Il Sung confidently predicted North Korea would overwhelm South Korea and impose a communist government on it within “three weeks.”

            After three years of brutal war, an armistice was signed on July 27, 1953 – with the borders of North and South  Korea still at the 38th Parallel, virtually unchanged.
            Thus, the communist invasion of South Korea by Kim Il Sung, followed by the invasion of almost a million Chinese Red Army troops sent by Mao Zedong as so-called “volunteers” to rescue Kim Il Sung’s routed armies after Gen. Douglas’ MacArthur’s successful end-run amphibious landing at Inchon on October 15, 1950 behind North Korea’s lines, was  a failure. 
            There can be no doubt that but for the sacrifices of American troops, fighting in what was called a United Nations “Police Action” but what was in fact a  proxy “hot war” in the “cold war” between the U.S and the communist Soviet Union and Red China, that Kim Il Sung, Stalin, and Mao would have succeeded in militarily overwhelming South Korea and imposing communism on it like that which exists in North Korea today: a totalitarian horror.
            The sacrifices of Americans in the Korean War were great: In the three years of fighting, 33,739 Americans died in battle. Another 2,835 died of other causes in theatre. Another 17,672 died in service during the war but not in theater. Some 103,284 suffered non-fatal wounds. Almost 8,000 troops were missing in action. More than 7,000 suffered torture and inhuman conditions as prisoners of war.             Altogether, some 5,700,000  Americans served worldwide during the Korean War, and 1,789,000 Americans actually served in theater in Korea.
            However, as the Korean War has become  America’s “Forgotten War,” and those who fought it have become America’s forgotten warriors.
            Veterans of the Korean War themselves are the prime movers in attempting to make Americans, especially the younger generations, aware of the importance of the Korean War, and the sacrifices of those who fought it, through the “Tell America” project of the Korean War Veterans of America. (www.KWVA.org).
KWVA Photo by Oregon Military Department
            KWVA members veterans are making themselves available as speakers, and providing a professionally done  CD video,  to service clubs, community groups, and especially to schools, so that the Korean War, and those who fought it, do not remain forgotten. They can be contacted at www.KWVA.org,; or by contacting national KWVA  “Tell America” project director Larry Kinard in Arlington, TX, by phone at 682-518-1040; or Oregon KWVA Commander Neil McCain at 541-660-6104, or by e-mail at neilmccain@clearwire.net.
            “We are ready, willing and able to discuss the reality of the Korean War with our fellow Americans through our  KWVA ‘Tell America’ speakers and showing our video, “ said Oregon KWVA Commander Neil McCain, 80, a native of Colorado who grew up in Los Angeles County in California, and now resides in Grants Pass with his wife, Carmen, whom he married 59 years ago when he came home from the Korean War.
            McCain, a retired electrical contractor  and entrepreneur who still consults , presents seminars, and teaches on electrical contracting through his McCain Institutes, volunteered to serve and went off to war in Korea as soon as he turned 18 after graduating from Bell Gardens High School in California.
            “As a kid, I saw WWII news and even movies at the shows. I wanted to serve my country. When I got to Korea, wow, the reality of war was far different than I imagined. Whoever said ‘war is hell’ got it right,” McCain said, soberly recalling, among other things  the death of a buddy who took a bullet while standing next to him, and died.            
            “There were a lot of sacrifices, but when we got home, it seemed that people weren’t really interested. They didn’t want to discuss the war. Some even expressed surprise that we were in a war in Korea,” he said.
            “The Korean War was forgotten even as we were fighting it,” he said. “It’s still forgotten.”
            That’s why McCain and his comrades in the KWVA are working so hard in their “Tell America” project to help Americans know about the war, and those who fought it.
            “The schools, they aren’t teaching the kids of this generation anything about the Korean War,” KWVA Commander McCain said. “I have contacted them to offer presentations by our vets and our video, but, so far there has been no interest.”
            McCain, knowledgeable, amiable, and articulate, is himself, a fount of information. On his own, he is putting together profiles of those who died serving in the Korean War, based on their home towns, counties, states. It is a monumental, and moving, project. Among his first is a volume of profiles of those young men he went to school with at Bell Gardens High School; kids who went to war in Korea; and who never came home. It is but one of the volumes. He has other volumes, including from Oregon and Washington.  He makes the material available on request, including to families who learn of it, so that those Korean War veterans who gave so much for the nation should not be forgotten, even by their descendants.
In that regard,
Photo of Oregon Korean War Memorial: The Korean War Project
            In 2011, Oregon became what is believed to be the first state in the nation to legislatively establish June 25 – the day the Korean War began in 1950 – as  annual “Korean War Veterans Honor Day.”
            That legislation resulted from an effort spearheaded by  McCain. He credits Rep. Sherrie Springer (R-Scio) for sponsoring the bill the KWVA proposed. The first ceremonies observing Korean War Veterans Honor Day took place on June 25, 2011, at the Oregon Korean War Veterans Memorial in Wilsonville.  This year, McCain held ceremonies at the Korean War Veterans Memorial on Saturday, June 23, and smaller observances June 25. The official  Oregon State Korean War Veterans Memorial is in Wilsonville, but there are Korean War Memorials also in Portland, and Salem.
            “I’m very proud that we have been able to have June 25 officially recognized as Korean War Veterans Honor Day in Oregon,” says the energetic McCain. “Now, I want to have I-5 named ‘Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway.”
            Few Americans are aware of how desperate were the circumstances and conditions in Korea, and how near success the communists came. When North Korea invaded, neither South Korea nor the U.S. was prepared for war. On the contrary, the U.S. had downgraded  and demobilized the military severely after WWII, seeking to cut costs. The Americans who were sent to war in Korea were ill-equipped – there were shortages of workable weapons and of ammunition;  they were ill-clothed—many fought in the bitterly cold Korean winter, sometimes at -40 degrees, in summer uniforms; they were ill-fed—many literally starved;  they were ill-trained – many were rushed into battle with minimal weapons training; and they were ill-informed—they were fighting a disciplined enemy thoroughly indoctrinated with communist ideology about which American troops had but minimal understanding, making them ill-equipped to deal with the new phenomenon of communist “brain washing.”  
            They were vastly outnumbered. The Communists in the first weeks overran nine-tenths of the South, pinning the 8th Army in the Pusan area at the southern end of the peninsula in only 10 per cent of the country. Troops who were overwhelmingly outnumbered and short of ammunition were ordered to defend that Pusan perimeter “to the death.” They were informed in Pusan: “Your orders are to stand; and die.” Thousands did. But they held on until the success of the Inchon amphibious landing at Inchon on October 15, 1950. Had it failed, the Americans surrounded on three sides at Pusan would have been decimated. They were able to break out of the Pusan perimeter only after the Inchon Landing.
            The intensity of the Korean War is reflected in the fact that more bombs were dropped in the Korean War in three years than had been dropped in the five years of WWII in the Pacific. The physical conditions in which the war was fought, particularly the cold in which the ill-equipped Americans served, were as deadly as the enemy.
            David Halberstram, in “The Coldest Winter: America And The Korean War,” quotes military historian S.L.A. Marshall as calling Korea “[t]he century’s nastiest little war.” Then-Secretary of State Dean Acheson wrote: “If the best minds in the world had set out to find us the worst possible location to fight this damnable war politically and militarily, the unanimous choice would have been Korea.”
            Halberstram wrote that Korea was a war “about which most Americans, save the men who fought there and their immediate families, preferred to know as little as possible….’The Forgotten War’ was the apt tile of one of the best books on it. Korea was a war that sometimes seemed to have been orphaned by history.”
            There are an estimated 2,500,000  living Korean War Veterans. Many continue to serve America through the KWVA and other veterans service organizations. The American Legion, the nation’s largest,  has some 467,040 Korean War veterans            among its 2.4-million members. All who served deserve to be remembered, and their service in the Korean War never forgotten. As the saying goes, “all gave some; and some gave all.”
            The National Korean War Memorial  was established in Washington, DC., in 1995. The inscription on it is: “Freedom Is Not Free.”
            The further engraved inscription is:
            “Our Nation Honors Her Sons And Daughters Who Answered The Call To Defend A Country They Never Knew And A People They Never Met. 1950-Korea-1953.”
            May it ever be so that the nation which the Korean War veterans served so well, honors and never forgets them, or their sacrifices for freedom. May God bless them all.
[Rees Lloyd is a civil rights attorney, Vietnam-era veteran, and a member of the Victoria Taft Blogforce]

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Victor Sharpe: War Crimes Which Go Unanswered

This is reprinted by permission by Victor Sharpe and was published originally at Renew America.  Victor is heard on the Victoria Taft Show every Tuesday at 2:16pm.
The increasing number of missiles deliberately fired from Gaza at southern Israel’s farms, villages and towns is a clear indictment of the Hamas terror machine that rules and occupies the Gaza Strip. It represents a catalog of Arab and Muslim war crimes.

There has been a 30% increase from the same period last year in the number of lethal rockets slamming into Israeli civilian homes with all the horror and misery that is inflicted upon the civilian population, particularly upon the little children who live in constant fear of when the next rocket will strike — usually with a mere 15 seconds warning.

In one day alone — June 21, 2012 — thirty one Hamas and Islamic Jihad missiles fell on Israel causing damage and trauma. But you probably read nothing about it in your local daily newspaper or saw or heard it mentioned on the TV.

Since Israel unilaterally left Gaza, as an unheard of peace gesture in 2005, her hope that the Arabs in Gaza would create a society based upon rational considerations, such as building hospitals, schools, or creating the infrastructure for a normal society at peace with its neighbor, has been shattered.

It was a pipe dream from the start and since 2005, when Israel’s then Prime Minister, Ariel Sharon, ordered what became known as the “Disengagement,” — a euphemism for wrecking the lives of so many of his own people — over 12,000 deadly Arab missiles have slammed into southern Israel’s civilian areas.

Ten thousand Israeli men, women and children were forcibly evicted by Israeli police under the so-called disengagement from their Gaza Strip farms and villages in order to prove Israel’s peaceful intentions: those Jewish civilians are mostly now still living as refugees within the Jewish state.

This is an indictment of the idiotic belief that still afflicts too many Israeli leaders, mostly those on the Left, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that the Arab and Muslim world will accept a non-Muslim state in land once conquered by Muslims in the name of Allah — even though Jewish patrimony in its ancestral and biblical homeland predates Islam by millennia.

What still evades the minds of too many Israeli and world leaders is the reality that in Islamic belief, wherever the Muslim foot has trod triumphal, that land forever is part of the Dar al-Islam (the House of Islam) and should it be lost, it then it becomes the Dar al-Harb (the House of War) and it is a religious injunction upon all Muslims to wage ceaseless war until it is recovered. Like the pernicious intrusion into Europe and Great Britain of Islamic Sharia law, the 21st century West is asleep and seemingly incapable of understanding that a 7th century religious war is upon it and winning.

Meanwhile, with Egypt lurching ever more into the clutches of the Muslim Brotherhood — thanks in large part to the foreign policies of President Obama — and the 40 or so year old peace treaty between Egypt and Israel practically torn in shreds by Egyptians, the Sinai Peninsula bordering Israel is aflame with increasing anti-Israel terror attacks now occurring along the entire length of the Israel-Egyptian border.

Remember, Israel gave away every last centimeter of the Sinai — a wonderful buffer zone between Egypt and the Jewish state. This territory consists of 97% of the so-called occupied territory Israel gave away in return for a peace treaty written on a piece of paper. Now Israel’s eastern neighbor, Jordan, is in grave danger of also succumbing to fanatical Islamist and jihadist control.

According to Khaled Abu Toameh, writing in the Jerusalem Post, “Jordanian government officials say there are growing signs that the kingdom’s powerful Muslim Brotherhood organization has plans to overthrow the regime.

“Today, most of the anti-regime demonstrations throughout the kingdom are being initiated and led by Muslim Brotherhood supporters whose goal is to turn Jordan into an Islamic republic.

“Many Arabs feel that President Barack Obama’s endorsement of the Muslim Brotherhood has emboldened the Islamists and increased their appetite to drive moderate and secular rulers out of the Arab world.”

Incidentally, a complaint to the BBC about why the media giant — which exists through British taxpayer money — always displays a permanent bias against Israel and never reports on Arab aggression against it, elicited the outrageous response from a BBC spokesperson, as follows:

“… It is the policy of the BBC only to report on Palestinian attacks against Israel when Israel retaliates.” Shameful.

Meanwhile Israeli aircraft hitting the Hamas and Islamic Jihad missile gangs, but only after they have either fired their missiles or it appears that they are on the verge of launching a lethal rocket attack, does nothing for the one million hapless residents of southern Israel whose lives are made permanently miserable by the evil that is launched against them from the Gaza Strip.

We are witnessing Arab and Muslim war crimes on a never ending spiral of horror inflicted upon Israel’s civilian population and the world yawns.

Only when the Jewish state is provoked beyond endurance and — as all nations have a right to do — defends itself and resists Palestinian barbarism, aggression and cold blooded terror — does the world awake.

Predictably the 57 Arab and Muslim states then rush to the terminally corrupt United Nations, which gleefully condemns not the Arab perpetrators and victimizers, but Israel, the perennial victim.

Such a sick world should hearken to the biblical injunction in Genesis 12:3. It ignores it at its peril.

Victor Sharpe is a prolific freelance writer and author of several books including the highly acclaimed trilogy, Politicide: The attempted murder of the Jewish state.

© Victor Sharpe

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Watch This Space for Arizona Immigration, ObamaCare and Stolen Valor Act Rulings from US Supreme Court

MIXED RULING ON ARIZONA IMMIGRATION LAW.  BACK IN A MINUTE. PART UPHELD 2 B: COPS CAN CHECK TO SEE IF SOMEONE IS ILLEGALLY IN UNITED STATES.
Here’s the ruling: http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/11pdf/11-182b5e1.pdf

SO FAR SCOTUS HAS RULED THERE CAN BE NO LIFE SENTENCES FOR MINORS WHO COMMITTED MURDER

SCOTUSBLOG LIVEBLOGGING HERE.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Rees Lloyd: LIBERTY MILESTONE: June 25, 1950 –The Korean War begins:

            June 25, 2012, is the 59th  anniversary of the commencement of the Korean War, often characterized as the “Forgotten War.” It is important, however, to remember, rather than forget, the Korean War,  and the Americans who fought it.

            The Korean War began on June 25, 1950, when North Korea, under the communist dictator  Kim Il Sung, invaded the Republic of South Korea by sending more than 200,000 troops across the 38thParallel which divided North from South. Supported by the communist dictators Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union and Mao Zedong of Red China,  Kim Il Sung confidently predicted North Korea would overwhelm South Korea and impose a communist government on it within “three weeks.”

            After three years of brutal war, an armistice was signed on July 27, 1953 – with the borders of North and South  Korea still at the 38th Parallel, virtually unchanged.
            Thus, the communist invasion of South Korea by Kim Il Sung, followed by the invasion of almost a million Chinese Red Army troops sent by Mao Zedong as so-called “volunteers” to rescue Kim Il Sung’s routed armies after Gen. Douglas’ MacArthur’s successful end-run amphibious landing at Inchon on October 15, 1950 behind North Korea’s lines, was  a failure. 
            There can be no doubt that but for the sacrifices of American troops, fighting in what was called a United Nations “Police Action” but what was in fact a  proxy “hot war” in the “cold war” between the U.S and the communist Soviet Union and Red China, that Kim Il Sung, Stalin, and Mao would have succeeded in militarily overwhelming South Korea and imposing communism on it like that which exists in North Korea today: a totalitarian horror.
            The sacrifices of Americans in the Korean War were great: In the three years of fighting, 33,739 Americans died in battle. Another 2,835 died of other causes in theatre. Another 17,672 died in service during the war but not in theater. Some 103,284 suffered non-fatal wounds. Almost 8,000 troops were missing in action. More than 7,000 suffered torture and inhuman conditions as prisoners of war.             Altogether, some 5,700,000  Americans served worldwide during the Korean War, and 1,789,000 Americans actually served in theater in Korea.
            However, as the Korean War has become  America’s “Forgotten War,” and those who fought it have become America’s forgotten warriors.
            Veterans of the Korean War themselves are the prime movers in attempting to make Americans, especially the younger generations, aware of the importance of the Korean War, and the sacrifices of those who fought it, through the “Tell America” project of the Korean War Veterans of America. (www.KWVA.org).
KWVA Photo by Oregon Military Department
            KWVA members veterans are making themselves available as speakers, and providing a professionally done  CD video,  to service clubs, community groups, and especially to schools, so that the Korean War, and those who fought it, do not remain forgotten. They can be contacted at www.KWVA.org,; or by contacting national KWVA  “Tell America” project director Larry Kinard in Arlington, TX, by phone at 682-518-1040; or Oregon KWVA Commander Neil McCain at 541-660-6104, or by e-mail at neilmccain@clearwire.net.
            “We are ready, willing and able to discuss the reality of the Korean War with our fellow Americans through our  KWVA ‘Tell America’ speakers and showing our video, “ said Oregon KWVA Commander Neil McCain, 80, a native of Colorado who grew up in Los Angeles County in California, and now resides in Grants Pass with his wife, Carmen, whom he married 59 years ago when he came home from the Korean War.
            McCain, a retired electrical contractor  and entrepreneur who still consults , presents seminars, and teaches on electrical contracting through his McCain Institutes, volunteered to serve and went off to war in Korea as soon as he turned 18 after graduating from Bell Gardens High School in California.
            “As a kid, I saw WWII news and even movies at the shows. I wanted to serve my country. When I got to Korea, wow, the reality of war was far different than I imagined. Whoever said ‘war is hell’ got it right,” McCain said, soberly recalling, among other things  the death of a buddy who took a bullet while standing next to him, and died.            
            “There were a lot of sacrifices, but when we got home, it seemed that people weren’t really interested. They didn’t want to discuss the war. Some even expressed surprise that we were in a war in Korea,” he said.
            “The Korean War was forgotten even as we were fighting it,” he said. “It’s still forgotten.”
            That’s why McCain and his comrades in the KWVA are working so hard in their “Tell America” project to help Americans know about the war, and those who fought it.
            “The schools, they aren’t teaching the kids of this generation anything about the Korean War,” KWVA Commander McCain said. “I have contacted them to offer presentations by our vets and our video, but, so far there has been no interest.”
            McCain, knowledgeable, amiable, and articulate, is himself, a fount of information. On his own, he is putting together profiles of those who died serving in the Korean War, based on their home towns, counties, states. It is a monumental, and moving, project. Among his first is a volume of profiles of those young men he went to school with at Bell Gardens High School; kids who went to war in Korea; and who never came home. It is but one of the volumes. He has other volumes, including from Oregon and Washington.  He makes the material available on request, including to families who learn of it, so that those Korean War veterans who gave so much for the nation should not be forgotten, even by their descendants.
In that regard,
Photo of Oregon Korean War Memorial: The Korean War Project
            In 2011, Oregon became what is believed to be the first state in the nation to legislatively establish June 25 – the day the Korean War began in 1950 – as  annual “Korean War Veterans Honor Day.”
            That legislation resulted from an effort spearheaded by  McCain. He credits Rep. Sherrie Springer (R-Scio) for sponsoring the bill the KWVA proposed. The first ceremonies observing Korean War Veterans Honor Day took place on June 25, 2011, at the Oregon Korean War Veterans Memorial in Wilsonville.  This year, McCain held ceremonies at the Korean War Veterans Memorial on Saturday, June 23, and smaller observances June 25. The official  Oregon State Korean War Veterans Memorial is in Wilsonville, but there are Korean War Memorials also in Portland, and Salem.
            “I’m very proud that we have been able to have June 25 officially recognized as Korean War Veterans Honor Day in Oregon,” says the energetic McCain. “Now, I want to have I-5 named ‘Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway.”
            Few Americans are aware of how desperate were the circumstances and conditions in Korea, and how near success the communists came. When North Korea invaded, neither South Korea nor the U.S. was prepared for war. On the contrary, the U.S. had downgraded  and demobilized the military severely after WWII, seeking to cut costs. The Americans who were sent to war in Korea were ill-equipped – there were shortages of workable weapons and of ammunition;  they were ill-clothed—many fought in the bitterly cold Korean winter, sometimes at -40 degrees, in summer uniforms; they were ill-fed—many literally starved;  they were ill-trained – many were rushed into battle with minimal weapons training; and they were ill-informed—they were fighting a disciplined enemy thoroughly indoctrinated with communist ideology about which American troops had but minimal understanding, making them ill-equipped to deal with the new phenomenon of communist “brain washing.”  
            They were vastly outnumbered. The Communists in the first weeks overran nine-tenths of the South, pinning the 8th Army in the Pusan area at the southern end of the peninsula in only 10 per cent of the country. Troops who were overwhelmingly outnumbered and short of ammunition were ordered to defend that Pusan perimeter “to the death.” They were informed in Pusan: “Your orders are to stand; and die.” Thousands did. But they held on until the success of the Inchon amphibious landing at Inchon on October 15, 1950. Had it failed, the Americans surrounded on three sides at Pusan would have been decimated. They were able to break out of the Pusan perimeter only after the Inchon Landing.
            The intensity of the Korean War is reflected in the fact that more bombs were dropped in the Korean War in three years than had been dropped in the five years of WWII in the Pacific. The physical conditions in which the war was fought, particularly the cold in which the ill-equipped Americans served, were as deadly as the enemy.
            David Halberstram, in “The Coldest Winter: America And The Korean War,” quotes military historian S.L.A. Marshall as calling Korea “[t]he century’s nastiest little war.” Then-Secretary of State Dean Acheson wrote: “If the best minds in the world had set out to find us the worst possible location to fight this damnable war politically and militarily, the unanimous choice would have been Korea.”
            Halberstram wrote that Korea was a war “about which most Americans, save the men who fought there and their immediate families, preferred to know as little as possible….’The Forgotten War’ was the apt tile of one of the best books on it. Korea was a war that sometimes seemed to have been orphaned by history.”
            There are an estimated 2,500,000  living Korean War Veterans. Many continue to serve America through the KWVA and other veterans service organizations. The American Legion, the nation’s largest,  has some 467,040 Korean War veterans            among its 2.4-million members. All who served deserve to be remembered, and their service in the Korean War never forgotten. As the saying goes, “all gave some; and some gave all.”
            The National Korean War Memorial  was established in Washington, DC., in 1995. The inscription on it is: “Freedom Is Not Free.”
            The further engraved inscription is:
            “Our Nation Honors Her Sons And Daughters Who Answered The Call To Defend A Country They Never Knew And A People They Never Met. 1950-Korea-1953.”
            May it ever be so that the nation which the Korean War veterans served so well, honors and never forgets them, or their sacrifices for freedom. May God bless them all.
[Rees Lloyd is a civil rights attorney, Vietnam-era veteran, and a member of the Victoria Taft Blogforce]

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Portland’s Catholic Archdiocese Gets in the National Fight Against ObamaCare

Portland’s Catholic Archdiocese has joined a national campaign to fight back against ObamaCare’s anti religious freedom mandates. The US Council of Bishops has begun an event called, Fortnight for Freedom. It started last Thursday and lasts until July 4th, American Independence Day.

The Portland Archdiocese has been particularly subdued since the Health and Human Service’s ObamaCare mandates became front page news. Last January, western Oregon Archbishop Vlazny was among many leaders who wrote a urging Catholics to get in the fight against the ObamaCare policies which forced Catholic institutions to provide coverage for abortion drugs, birth control and offer services ending pregnancies. At the time, Archbishop Vlazny said, “We can not and will not comply with this unjust law.” See the letter nearby.


While parish priests from other diocese across the country read their respective letters from their pulpits or handed parishioners the letter, reports from parishes in Portland showed a much more subdued treatment. The letter, I was told, was put in some cases in the backs of sanctuaries or maybe stuffed in a weekly bulletin. In fact, not only did the Archdiocese not want to give me a copy of the letter they didn’t want to TALK about it at all.

That’s all changed. The Archdiocese’s webpage now features the Fortnight for Freedom prominently on its front page. Before, you couldn’t get a look at the Archbishop’s letter.

Before I couldn’t get the spokesman from the Archdiocese to come on the program and tell me what was going on, but on Friday’s show spokesman Bud Bunce was quite gracious–and vehement–about the stakes involved in getting rid of these mandates. Hear my interview here at 1:16 on Friday.

Bunce said this is the first time he can remember when the Portland Archdiocese has involved itself in a political fight like this. On the other hand, it’s never had to fight for a purpose that so clearly breaks faith with the First Amendment.

Listen to the short interview. And then pray that the US Supreme Court overturns this ghastly unconstitutional monstrosity this week.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

This never happens in Portland. 
Moderately edited.  Try to guess.  Look for anything at least minimally outrageous.
OMG!  Nordstrom’s?

Black mob violence has taken on a new note in Portland, Ore. It’s not the unsuspecting passersby or the corner convenience store that’s the target here.

It’s Nordstrom’s.

Just weeks ago, a group of 10-15 hoodie-wearing blacks allegedly stole clothing and raced out of the store. Their actions were captured on video.   [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i604Bs4GoM4&feature=related]

Here’s Lloyd Center:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=0pBbJP8osvM&NR=1

And a gas station: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=RYT18NOECqA

So far, the evidence makes it looks like just one more of the hundreds of episodes of racial lawlessness that have taken place in more than 60 cities over the last three years.  Or is it in more than three cities over the past 60 years?  I’m so confused.
But on a local forum, the reaction gave the situation a truly unique flavor:
“As an employee of a Portland area Nordstrom I have to wonder why you think that we care?” said Jason Handleman. “Things like this make work interesting and I hold no ill-will toward anyone in this group. Our security personnel spend more time concerned with employees than clientele, and honestly most employees, at my store, would not help them if they were in an altercation.”  Hell, we’d applaud the attackers.  Those MFers never give us any peace.  We only lift a little bit.
A Nordstrom manager did not respond to a request for comment.  It would have required an intelligent response to the situation, and she had not been briefed.
But other Portland commenters joined in the forum. From an anonymous participant, “Rich white high school students wait, and grow up to flash mob our economy and legally manipulate our Congress with unregulated lobbying. They are taught by their rich white parents that they are helping grow the economy through deregulation and small government.
“Funny, the Oregonian does not report on the rich old white guys who flash mob and are hijacking our economy and schools. It’s well reported in many respected and less corporate newspapers: Guardian, BBC, Aljazeera, Le Monde, and Democracy Now.”  Yeah.  Right.
Nordstrom is located in the Lloyd Center mall, the site of two violent episodes over the last two years.  You can still go to the downtown Nordstrom, on 6th, and be perfectly immune to any unpleasantry.
In April of 2011, two black men were arrested for murder after shooting into a gang of black teenagers who had just left the mall, leaving one dead.  Whew!  Ducked that one!
The year before, 20 black men harassed the customer of a shoe store in the mall before shots rang out. No one was hit.  He was white.
“The past two weeks have seen four shootings tied to the African American gangs, the most recent an alleged attempted murder in an athletic shoe store at the mall Wednesday evening,” said the Oregonian, in a rare admission of the race of the alleged criminals.
The Nordstrom theft was one of at least four recent “flash robs.”
In April, a mob of 20 black people chased a white couple into a convenience store. The local papers described the ensuing assault and robbery as a “fight.” The mob left when one of the employees sprayed them with “bear spray.”  Urine usually works.
All on video – almost identical to a crime from a few days before.
In June, a bigger crowd attacked a Troutdale, OR, Albertson’s grocery store, following the same play book: Theft, destruction, intimidation. And no arrests, despite the video. [http://www.kptv.com/story/18813048/teen-mob-flash-robs-albertsons-store]
National Federation of Retailers says flash robs attacked one in 10 stores last year – half were hit several times.
Even so, local defenders abound: “Come on folks, they are not thugs, they are students of YOUR Public Education System,” said Rich of the Albertson’s mob in the comments section of the Oregonian.  I mean, what do you expect, with what we teach in our schools?
Portland has also seen its share of public racial violence on the city’s MAX public transit system.
In January of this year, a 14-year old white girl was beaten down by three black women while about a dozen other black people took videos, shouted racial epithets, and encouraged the assault.     http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2012/01/trimet_beating_of_14-year-old.html
Four people were arrested, including a mother of two of the assailants. The mother was convicted of giving police false information while trying to hide her daughters.
Despite the video evidence, the district attorney declined to file hate-crime charges.  It is not known if he filed any charges at all.
When a local TV station went to a community college to do a news story featuring a class discussing hate crimes, at least one of the students said the decision was fine with her because all involved were “brats” and besides, she did not see what happened before the video was taken. The white girl may have provoked it, said the student.  They often do.
In June, four black people were arrested for assaulting a police office at a MAX station.
The most recent attacks are also the largest – and to some the most troubling.
It was just three months ago the Oregonian, reporting on a police shooting in Laurelhurst Park, assured their readers the park was otherwise safe.
“Laurelhurst, a neighborhood of stately homes surrounding one of Portland’s loveliest park lakes, is better know for its seasonal tree colors than for violent crime,” said the paper.
“Fern Wilgus, Laurelhurst Neighborhood Association’s public safety chairwoman, said the tennis court area has attracted sporadic fights and robberies over the years.”  But the trees are lovely, and contrast nicely with the bodily fluids flowing from the tennis courts.
So never mind about that. The paper’s willingness to minimize the racial violence seemed similar to how a social work characterized dozens of violent episodes in Philadelphia, some involving more than 1,000 black people: “That’s just kids blowing off some steam.”  This steam could have powered a small village for 6 months.
And of course there was the homosexual rape in Laurelhurst park following a carjacking that began after a Latino man got lost near Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Two of the three attackers were identified as black.  The other one was beige.  Latinos are not supposed to get lost.
Still, people seemed surprised when in June, a group of 150 black people – described by the newspapers as drunken teenagers – assaulted several people in the park, robbing at least one of them.  The others were only assaulted, not robbed.  150 people were not accused of assault.
The newspaper – and the TV broadcast – may have shied away from describing the attackers, but the Internet site of a local TV station was a little more revealing:
“Both fights involved groups of black teenagers randomly attacking people in the park.”

The following night, a group of 20 to 30 black people, came upon three people on a tennis courts at the park: “Some of the teens began throwing bottles onto the court and calling out to them. They said the teens then began fighting with them.”

Luckily this this wasn’t white on black crime, or else we’d never hear the end of it.

But, all this would be unnecessary if they had only followed the guidelines on not mentioning the colors of the offending parties.  When will they learn?

Jim