Monthly Archives: September 2011

Washington State, Let’s Honor Our South Vietnamese Allies

Most of us have heard the derision against the ARVN (Army Republic of Viet Nam), “Want to buy some ARVN rifles? Never been fired and only dropped once!” That it is a rehash from earlier times makes it no less stinging in its denunciation of the South Vietnamese Forces that fought in South Viet Nam many years ago.

It’s also very untrue. The South Vietnamese soldiers, sailors and airmen fought for their country as hard as any other soldier ever has.

While America lost over 58,000 of our sons in Viet Nam, South Viet Nam lost about 266,000 of theirs. In all, the South Vietnamese Forces were effective fighters, even though they were often under trained and under armed while facing a hostile communist force well trained and well armed by the Communist Chinese and the former Soviet Union.

Knowing this, I am left perplexed reading the Olympian’s headline, Plan to honor Vietnamese soldiers on memorial in Olympia angers U.S. vets.

It seems that a small band of U.S. Veterans groups, Vietnamese Veterans and community members has been working with the State Department of Veterans Affairs to add an inscription alongside the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Olympia to honor both Republic of Vietnam and American soldiers who fought in Viet Nam.
Private donations are being sought for a simple small inscription to be placed adjacent to the Viet Nam Memorial in the Capital Campus in Olympia.

The inscription would read in English, “We remember with gratitude the soldiers of the Republic of Vietnam and the United States who fought and died for freedom and democracy in Vietnam.”

It would also be engraved in Vietnamese.

It is tragic to see former Combat Medic, Hal Lymus who was instrumental in raising the funds to construct the Viet Nam Memorial in Olympia among those expressing strong opposition to this project. While I respect his right to be opposed, I disagree with his reasoning.

He says, “We have nothing against the Vietnamese community whatsoever. It’s just that this wall is meant for one thing: the Washington citizens who died or are missing in action and for the guys who died as a result of their injuries.” He added in regards to the 1,116 names of Washington State citizens engraved on the Memorial, “A lot of these guys died in my arms.”

We lost 13 in my unit during my own 18 months in country. My best buddy was shot down and medevaced out to Japan before I could even see how he was. So I understand the intent of the Memorial, but I also see that many who were forced to flee South Viet Nam settled in Washington and were citizens when the Memorial was dedicated on May 25, 1987.

I also understand the bitterness many of us still feel concerning how we were received coming home from Viet Nam and the hostility shown us. That is a large part behind so many states and Washington D.C. dedicating specific Memorials just for our Viet Nam lost.

But I am also reminded it was not the Vietnamese refugees fortunate enough to make it to America after our government turned their backs on the struggling South Vietnamese who treated us that, but our own citizens.
Comments from the Vietnamese Community include, “The addition gives us a place to show our respect and remember our love ones who died in the war. After the war, our war dead have no place of honor in Vietnam. Their cemeteries were destroyed or moved by the communists.”

Dale Parsons a former Platoon Sergeant says, “I think it honors all those who fought and served in Vietnam. It’s about both countries; we fought side by side.”

A former infantryman named Lee adds, “It was pretty remarkable what happened there. There was a lot of testimony. A lot of tears were shed. … Everybody we talked to said, ‘Wow, great idea’.”

Still, there are those who seem to still be clinging to the myth of the cowardly South Vietnamese Soldier like Chuck Manley of Tumwater who says he is “digging in for a fight.” He says he has spoken to several Veterans about the addition of the inscription and received answers of “not no, but hell no.”

Manley also said, “This thing is going to turn into a battle. We’ve got numerous senators and representatives who are with us on this, who are concerned about it. All this project is going to do is cause bad and hostile feelings between Veterans, Citizens and the Vietnamese community.”

I find it very disappointing that there are those so adamantly against honoring our allies and citizens in Washington State that they say they are “digging in for a fight” and it’s “going to be a battle.”

Over the years I have had several Vietnamese, seeing me in my Vietnam Veterans Cap I am noted to wear, walk up to shake my hand and thank me for fighting in their country. The lady that cuts my hair was one of the Boat People who escaped in 1980 and now has grown sons of her own, all of whom either have or are serving in the American Armed Services, including Iraq and Afghanistan.

These people were not our enemies, they were our allies. And, for every tale heard of an atrocity committed, there were a thousand incidents of bravery and compassion that never made the news.

Supporters have already indicated they are not willing to further divide people over this and if the opposition is enough, will call it off.

I think the most tragic part of this is that those who fought so bravely and were basically sold out by a weak spine congress due to spoon fed disinformation from the anti-left and like John ‘F’in Kerry may be denied a simple honor from their fellow citizens of Washington State.

We Viet Nam Veterans did not receive a “welcome home” and have welcomed each other home over the years.

I think it is about time we welcomed the Vietnamese refugees to their new home.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Anwar al Awlaki Reported Dead.

The man who was the inspiration for the Christmas bomber, Times Square bomber AND Fort Hood terrorist Major Hasan reportedly has been killed in Yemen.
Two interesting things. Look at this story from the AP. Major Hasan isn’t mentioned. 

The 40-year-old al-Awlaki is believed to have inspired and even plotted or helped coordinate some of the recent attacks on the U.S., including the failed Christmas Day 2009 bombing of an airliner heading for Detroit, Michigan, and the also unsuccessful plot to send mail bombs on planes from Yemen to the United States in October.
Then look at this old ABC story of the connection between Major Hasan and al Awlaki. 

United States Army Major Nidal Hasan told a radical cleric considered by authorities to be an al-Qaeda recruiter, “I can’t wait to join you” in the afterlife, according to an American official with top secret access to 18 e-mails exchanged between Hasan and the cleric, Anwar al Awlaki, over a six month period between Dec. 2008 and June 2009. 

Awlaki, who was born in New Mexico, was once the imam of a Falls Church, Virginia mosque attended by Hasan and two of the 9/11 hijackers. After an intensive investigation by the FBI, Awlaki moved to Yemen where he was imprisoned in 2006 and says he was interrogated by U.S. authorities.

 
Then look at this story from 2010 when the Obama State Department put him on the hit list (imagine Bush doing that and the blow back he’d get) but the terrorist designation never mentions Hasan. 

Although not mentioned by Treasury, Awlaki has also been linked to Major Nidal Hasan, the US Army doctor who murdered 13 soldiers at a deployment center at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009. While Awlaki had originally denied radicalizing Hasan, his emails, which he provided to Al Jazeera, show that he provided the religious justification for Hasan to conduct the attacks.
In March 2010, Awlaki released an audiotape praising Hasan and Abdulmutallab’s attacks on the US. He also admitted that he is now at war with the US.

And from the Terror watchers at the Long War Journal 

Awlaki released a videotape in April 2010 in which he claimed he was “proud” to have trained Hasan and Abdulmutallab. “I am proud to have been their teacher,” Awlaki said in the videotape, which was aired on Al Jazeera.

Just interesting facts from a press and Administration that is loathe to label the Ft Hood massacre a terrorist act. 
Hey Anwar al Awlaki: I hope you’re really dead. 

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Washington State, Let’s Honor Our South Vietnamese Allies

Most of us have heard the derision against the ARVN (Army Republic of Viet Nam), “Want to buy some ARVN rifles? Never been fired and only dropped once!” That it is a rehash from earlier times makes it no less stinging in its denunciation of the South Vietnamese Forces that fought in South Viet Nam many years ago.

It’s also very untrue. The South Vietnamese soldiers, sailors and airmen fought for their country as hard as any other soldier ever has.

While America lost over 58,000 of our sons in Viet Nam, South Viet Nam lost about 266,000 of theirs. In all, the South Vietnamese Forces were effective fighters, even though they were often under trained and under armed while facing a hostile communist force well trained and well armed by the Communist Chinese and the former Soviet Union.

Knowing this, I am left perplexed reading the Olympian’s headline, Plan to honor Vietnamese soldiers on memorial in Olympia angers U.S. vets.

It seems that a small band of U.S. Veterans groups, Vietnamese Veterans and community members has been working with the State Department of Veterans Affairs to add an inscription alongside the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Olympia to honor both Republic of Vietnam and American soldiers who fought in Viet Nam.
Private donations are being sought for a simple small inscription to be placed adjacent to the Viet Nam Memorial in the Capital Campus in Olympia.

The inscription would read in English, “We remember with gratitude the soldiers of the Republic of Vietnam and the United States who fought and died for freedom and democracy in Vietnam.”

It would also be engraved in Vietnamese.

It is tragic to see former Combat Medic, Hal Lymus who was instrumental in raising the funds to construct the Viet Nam Memorial in Olympia among those expressing strong opposition to this project. While I respect his right to be opposed, I disagree with his reasoning.

He says, “We have nothing against the Vietnamese community whatsoever. It’s just that this wall is meant for one thing: the Washington citizens who died or are missing in action and for the guys who died as a result of their injuries.” He added in regards to the 1,116 names of Washington State citizens engraved on the Memorial, “A lot of these guys died in my arms.”

We lost 13 in my unit during my own 18 months in country. My best buddy was shot down and medevaced out to Japan before I could even see how he was. So I understand the intent of the Memorial, but I also see that many who were forced to flee South Viet Nam settled in Washington and were citizens when the Memorial was dedicated on May 25, 1987.

I also understand the bitterness many of us still feel concerning how we were received coming home from Viet Nam and the hostility shown us. That is a large part behind so many states and Washington D.C. dedicating specific Memorials just for our Viet Nam lost.

But I am also reminded it was not the Vietnamese refugees fortunate enough to make it to America after our government turned their backs on the struggling South Vietnamese who treated us that, but our own citizens.
Comments from the Vietnamese Community include, “The addition gives us a place to show our respect and remember our love ones who died in the war. After the war, our war dead have no place of honor in Vietnam. Their cemeteries were destroyed or moved by the communists.”

Dale Parsons a former Platoon Sergeant says, “I think it honors all those who fought and served in Vietnam. It’s about both countries; we fought side by side.”

A former infantryman named Lee adds, “It was pretty remarkable what happened there. There was a lot of testimony. A lot of tears were shed. … Everybody we talked to said, ‘Wow, great idea’.”

Still, there are those who seem to still be clinging to the myth of the cowardly South Vietnamese Soldier like Chuck Manley of Tumwater who says he is “digging in for a fight.” He says he has spoken to several Veterans about the addition of the inscription and received answers of “not no, but hell no.”

Manley also said, “This thing is going to turn into a battle. We’ve got numerous senators and representatives who are with us on this, who are concerned about it. All this project is going to do is cause bad and hostile feelings between Veterans, Citizens and the Vietnamese community.”

I find it very disappointing that there are those so adamantly against honoring our allies and citizens in Washington State that they say they are “digging in for a fight” and it’s “going to be a battle.”

Over the years I have had several Vietnamese, seeing me in my Vietnam Veterans Cap I am noted to wear, walk up to shake my hand and thank me for fighting in their country. The lady that cuts my hair was one of the Boat People who escaped in 1980 and now has grown sons of her own, all of whom either have or are serving in the American Armed Services, including Iraq and Afghanistan.

These people were not our enemies, they were our allies. And, for every tale heard of an atrocity committed, there were a thousand incidents of bravery and compassion that never made the news.

Supporters have already indicated they are not willing to further divide people over this and if the opposition is enough, will call it off.

I think the most tragic part of this is that those who fought so bravely and were basically sold out by a weak spine congress due to spoon fed disinformation from the anti-left and like John ‘F’in Kerry may be denied a simple honor from their fellow citizens of Washington State.

We Viet Nam Veterans did not receive a “welcome home” and have welcomed each other home over the years.

I think it is about time we welcomed the Vietnamese refugees to their new home.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Anwar al Awlaki Reported Dead.

The man who was the inspiration for the Christmas bomber, Times Square bomber AND Fort Hood terrorist Major Hasan reportedly has been killed in Yemen.
Two interesting things. Look at this story from the AP. Major Hasan isn’t mentioned. 

The 40-year-old al-Awlaki is believed to have inspired and even plotted or helped coordinate some of the recent attacks on the U.S., including the failed Christmas Day 2009 bombing of an airliner heading for Detroit, Michigan, and the also unsuccessful plot to send mail bombs on planes from Yemen to the United States in October.
Then look at this old ABC story of the connection between Major Hasan and al Awlaki. 

United States Army Major Nidal Hasan told a radical cleric considered by authorities to be an al-Qaeda recruiter, “I can’t wait to join you” in the afterlife, according to an American official with top secret access to 18 e-mails exchanged between Hasan and the cleric, Anwar al Awlaki, over a six month period between Dec. 2008 and June 2009. 

Awlaki, who was born in New Mexico, was once the imam of a Falls Church, Virginia mosque attended by Hasan and two of the 9/11 hijackers. After an intensive investigation by the FBI, Awlaki moved to Yemen where he was imprisoned in 2006 and says he was interrogated by U.S. authorities.

 
Then look at this story from 2010 when the Obama State Department put him on the hit list (imagine Bush doing that and the blow back he’d get) but the terrorist designation never mentions Hasan. 

Although not mentioned by Treasury, Awlaki has also been linked to Major Nidal Hasan, the US Army doctor who murdered 13 soldiers at a deployment center at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009. While Awlaki had originally denied radicalizing Hasan, his emails, which he provided to Al Jazeera, show that he provided the religious justification for Hasan to conduct the attacks.
In March 2010, Awlaki released an audiotape praising Hasan and Abdulmutallab’s attacks on the US. He also admitted that he is now at war with the US.

And from the Terror watchers at the Long War Journal 

Awlaki released a videotape in April 2010 in which he claimed he was “proud” to have trained Hasan and Abdulmutallab. “I am proud to have been their teacher,” Awlaki said in the videotape, which was aired on Al Jazeera.

Just interesting facts from a press and Administration that is loathe to label the Ft Hood massacre a terrorist act. 
Hey Anwar al Awlaki: I hope you’re really dead. 

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Willamette Week’s Inbred Intolerance

We folks on the right love to point up the plentiful hypocrisies on the left, especially when it comes to “tolerance.” We’re made out to be out-of-touch intolerant knuckle draggers if we don’t agree with someone’s illegal, immoral or demonstrably dopey conduct. They remain blissfully oblivious to their intolerance of our beliefs.

But this example of ignorance and intolerance out of the latest edition of Willamette Week beckoned me forth to give offense. And so I shall:


This is the story of the owner of The Viewpoint Inn’s battle with the thugs at the “Friends of the Gorge.” Read the story here. The “radical environmentalists,” as the owner accurately calls them, basically bled dry the finances of cash strapped entrepreneur Geoff Thompson. 


Geoff Thompson, whom I’ve had on the program several times about his property rights battles, is gay and apparently has a penchant for posing for calendars.

Here’s where the left’s intolerance and the Willamette Week’s inbred idiocy comes into play. 

In the discussion of people who had come to the aid of Thompson and his partner the WW observes:

With help from an unlikely collection of allies, including conservative property rights advocates and state Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Thompson reopened the inn on Memorial Day 2007, after a three-year land-use battle that left him deeply in debt.

You seldom if ever see those kinds of words applied to, let’s say, the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU is held out a neutral “civil rights” organization in journalism. But the ACLU is a leftist organization which doesn’t help conservative causes as a general rule. This is because the ACLU is a political organization–not a civil rights organization. Let that one sink in for a moment. (You might want to ask former ACLU attorney and Victoria Taft blog force writer Rees Lloyd about that if you have any quaint questions about that. )

But not so Oregonians in Action or The Victoria Taft Show.  To the left (including journalists) it’s inconceivable that their caricature of conservatism could include tolerance of a gay man–even one with a private property rights issue. We’re so wedded to intolerance their thinking goes that we won’t help this gay guy.

Who’s prejudiced here?

Equally sad is that Willamette Week perceives private property rights issues to be a conservative issue. That’s probably because their “neutral” ACLU rarely helps anyone with a private property issue. Wonder why? It’s a “civil right” is it not? 


WW’s can’t–or chooses not to–disconnect their prejudiced and intolerant view of conservatives from the issue of a gay guy who has a property rights issue.

We don’t see his gayness, WW, we see the issue. 

Your ignorance is showing.

And, in case you missed it, private property rights are a civil right, dilweeds. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.[1]




Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com