Daily Archives: February 3, 2011

SOROS: Muslim Brotherhood in League With El Baradei "Hopeful" Sign; Israel "Stumbling Block"

George Soros (here): “The Muslim Brotherhood’s cooperation with Mohamed ElBaradei, the Nobel laureate who is seeking to run for president, is a hopeful sign that it intends to play a constructive role in a democratic political system.” Nobody can say Soros doesn’t practices what he preaches. He supports legalizing drugs and euthanasia. So you see, while Soros is apparently under the influence, he urges the euthanasia of America by Dr. Zawahiri. It’s all clear to me now….

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Rees Lloyd: Feb 3rd, Four Chaplains Day

 “Four Chaplains Day” is to be observed annually on February 3 in America by the unanimous resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1988. It is a day to remember February 3, 1943, one of the most remarkable and inspiring acts of heroism in the history of warfare took place in World War II. It is a day to honor the heroism of the Four Chaplains, who selflessly gave their lives  “that others may live.”
However, although veterans in The American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and other veterans organizations,  will hold special observances on Four Chaplains Day, most American media, most American schools,  and, therefore, most Americans, will not observe it. Indeed, most  Americans, including children who will not be taught about in their schools, will  not even know that there is a National Four Chaplains day, or why. This is true  even though, as a former soldier who owed his life to them has said: “[T]heir heroism is beyond belief. That is one of the reasons why we must tell the world what these people did.”.
 
On February 3, 1943, the Dorchester, a converted luxury cruise ship, was transporting Army troops to Greenland, escorted by three Coast Guard Cutters and accompanied by two slow moving freighters.
On board were some 900 troops, and four chaplains, of diverse religions and backgrounds, but of a common faith and commitment to serve God, country, and all the troops, regardless of their religious beliefs, or non-belief. The four Chaplains are:
Rev. George Fox (Methodist); Father John Washington (Roman Catholic); Jewish Rabbi Alexander Goode; and Rev. Clark Poling** (Dutch Reformed).
At approximately 12:55 a.m., in the dead of a freezing night, the Dorchester was hit by a torpedo fired by German U-boat 233 in an area so infested with German submarines it was known as “Torpedo Junction.”

The blast ripped a hole in the ship from below the waterline to the top deck.
The engine room was instantly flooded. Crewmen, who were not scalded to death by steam escaping from broken pipes and the ship’s boiler, were drowned.
Hundreds of troops in the flooded lower compartments were drowned, or washed out to the frigid waters, where most would die.
In less than a minute, the Dorchester lost way, and listed on a 30-degree angle. Troops on deck searched for life jackets in panic, clung to rails and other handholds, saw overloaded life boats overturn in the turgid water, leaped overboard as a last desperate hope for life. Many with life jackets drowned when the life preservers became waterlogged.
Of the 900 troops and crew on board, two-thirds would ultimately die; most of those who survived, had lifelong infirmities and pain from their time in the icy waters.
Dorchester survivors told of the wild pandemonium on board when it was hit and began sinking. Many men had not slept in their clothes and life vests as ordered because of the heat in the crowded quarters below. There was panic, fear, terror; death was no abstraction but real, immediate, seemingly inescapable.
The four Chaplains acted together to try bring some order to the chaos, to calm the panic of the troops, to alleviate their fear and terror, to pray with and for them, to help save their lives.
The Chaplains passed out life jackets, helping those too panicked to put them on correctly, until the awful moment arrived when there were no more life jackets to be given out.
It was then that a most remarkable act of heroism, courage, faith, and love took place:
Each of the four Chaplains took off his life jacket, and, knowing that act made death certain, put his life jacket on a soldier who didn’t have one, refusing to listen to any protest that they should not make such a sacrifice.
They continued to help the troops until the last moment.
Then, as the ship sank into the raging sea, the four Chaplains linked hands and arms, and could be seen and heard by the survivors praying together, even singing hymns, joined together in faith, love, and unity, as they sacrificed their lives so “that others might live.”
The few survivors testified to the selfless act of the four Chaplains:

“The ship started sinking and as I left the ship, I looked back and saw the chaplains with their hands clasped, praying for the boys. They never made any attempt to save themselves, but they did try to save the others. I think their names should be on the list of ‘The Greatest Heroes’ of this war,” testified Grady L. Clark.


“I saw all four chaplains take off their life belts and give them to soldiers who had none. The last I saw of them they were still praying, talking, and preaching to the soldiers,” attested survivor Thomas W. Myers Jr.


“It is impressed clearly in my mind that these chaplains demonstrated unsurpassed courage and heroism when they willingly gave their life belts to four enlisted men, who, because of the utter confusion and disorder brought about by the torpedoing, had become hysterical. They helped save the lives of many of the troops,” testified John F. Garey.


These testimonies, taken from author Dan Kurzman’s valuable book “No Greater Glory: The Four Immortal Chaplains and the Sinking of the Dorchester in World War II,” are but some of the sworn statements of grateful survivors upon which Congress awarded the Four Chaplains an unprecedented “Congressional Medal of Valor” in 1961.

Earlier, in 1944, they were awarded Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross. They did not receive the Medal of Honor because of restrictions limiting that medal to combatants. In 2004, delegates to The American Legion National Convention representing 2.7-million wartime veterans, voted to support making an exception and awarding the Medal of Honor to the Four Chaplains.
The lesson of their lives is as inspiring as is the lesson of their ultimate sacrifice. Information is available from a number of sources, principally by the Immortal Chaplains Foundation, and the affiliated Chapel of the Four Chaplains, which awards the Immortal Chaplains Prize for Humanity, and whose logo is: “That others may live.” (www.immortalchaplains.org; The Immortal Chaplains Foundation, On the Queen Mary , 1126

At the dedication of the Chapel of the Four Chaplains in 1951, then-President Harry S. Truman said their sacrifice reflected the fact that “the unity of our country is a unity under God.”
“This interfaith shrine will stand through long generations to teach Americans that as men can die heroically as brothers so should they live together in mutual faith and good will,” President Truman said.
Ben Epstein, a Jewish survivor who often spoke to audiences about the Four Chaplains, was quoted by author Kurzman as describing the meaning of their sacrifice by putting a question to himself, and, thereby, to all other Americans:

“I ask myself, could I do it? Take my life preserver and give it to someone else? Absolutely not. I don’t think I could do it. I didn’t do it. And I ask you in the audience,  how many of you could do it? And I don’t want an answer. That’s why I say their bravery; their heroism is beyond belief. That is one of the reasons why we must tell the world what these people did.”.


The American Legion has been conducting annual Four Chaplains remembrances for almost half a  century, publishes material, and has produced a video, “The American Legion Remembers the Four Chaplains,” all of which are available through its Chaplains Program. (Acy@legion.org; The American Legion, Attn: Chaplains Program, PO Box 1055, Indianapolis, IN 46206 (317-630-1212).
May the God the Four Chaplains served bless and keep them; and may the nation they so heroically served always remember and honor them.
[Rees Lloyd is a longtime civil rights attorney and veterans activist.]



**Rev. Clark V. Poling  was the son of famed evangelist Daniel A. Poling of Portland, OR, who had served as a Chaplain in WWI. Rev. Daniel Poling was an Evangelical Minister at the beginning of his career, and was rebaptized as a Baptist Minister in 1936. That same year, his son, Clark, graduated from Yale with a divinity degree, and was ordained a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church. 
When WWII broke out, Rev. Clark Poling decided to follow in his father’s footsteps and serve as a Chaplain to soldiers. His famous father, Rev. Daniel Poling, warned his son that Chaplains in WWI “sustained the highest mortality rate of all military personnel.”
Rev. Clark Poling was undeterred, and attained Chaplains School at Harvard with Chaplains Fox, Goode, and Washington, with whom he would heroically go to his death so “that others may live”
Ironically, not one of the Four Chaplains could be trained by the Army at Harvard today. Harvard,  despite its founding by Christians to perpetuate Christianity, barred ROTC from Harvard under the leadership of liberal progressive Elena Kagan. Today, she sits on the U.S. Supreme Court, by appointment of liberal progressive President Barack Hussein Obama, while the Four Chaplains would be persona non grata at Harvard, not withstanding that both Kagan and Obama, who never deigned to serve,  owe their freedom to military men and women like the heroic Four Chaplains.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

SOROS: Muslim Brotherhood in League With El Baradei "Hopeful" Sign; Israel "Stumbling Block"

George Soros (here): “The Muslim Brotherhood’s cooperation with Mohamed ElBaradei, the Nobel laureate who is seeking to run for president, is a hopeful sign that it intends to play a constructive role in a democratic political system.” Nobody can say Soros doesn’t practices what he preaches. He supports legalizing drugs and euthanasia. So you see, while Soros is apparently under the influence, he urges the euthanasia of America by Dr. Zawahiri. It’s all clear to me now….

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

FEBRUARY 3 –NATIONAL FOUR CHAPLAINS DAY

By REES LLOYD

Also seen at World Net Daily

“Four Chaplains Day” is to be observed annually on February 3 in America by the unanimous resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1988. It is a day to remember February 3, 1943, one of the most remarkable and inspiring acts of heroism in the history of warfare took place in World War II. It is a day to honor the heroism of the Four Chaplains, who selflessly gave their lives “that others may live.”

However, although veterans in The American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and other veterans organizations, will hold special observances on Four Chaplains Day, most American media, most American schools, and, therefore, most Americans, will not observe it. Indeed, most Americans, including children who will not be taught about in their schools, will not even know that there is a National Four Chaplains day, or why. This is true even though, as a former soldier who owed his life to them has said: “[T]heir heroism is beyond belief. That is one of the reasons why we must tell the world what these people did.”

On February 3, 1943, the Dorchester, a converted luxury cruise ship, was transporting Army troops to Greenland, escorted by three Coast Guard Cutters and accompanied by two slow moving freighters.

On board were some 900 troops, and four chaplains, of diverse religions and backgrounds, but of a common faith and commitment to serve God, country, and all the troops, regardless of their religious beliefs, or non-belief. The four Chaplains are:

Rev. George Fox (Methodist); Father John Washington (Roman Catholic); Jewish Rabbi Alexander Goode; and Rev. Clark Poling (Dutch Reformed).

At approximately 12:55 a.m., in the dead of a freezing night, the Dorchester was hit by a torpedo fired by German U-boat 233 in an area so infested with German submarines it was known as “Torpedo Junction.”

The blast ripped a hole in the ship from below the waterline to the top deck.

The engine room was instantly flooded. Crewmen, who were not scalded to death by steam escaping from broken pipes and the ship’s boiler, were drowned.

Hundreds of troops in the flooded lower compartments were drowned, or washed out to the frigid waters, where most would die.

In less than a minute, the Dorchester lost way, and listed on a 30-degree angle. Troops on deck searched for life jackets in panic, clung to rails and other handholds, saw overloaded life boats overturn in the turgid water, leaped overboard as a last desperate hope for life. Many with life jackets drowned when the life preservers became waterlogged.

Of the 900 troops and crew on board, two-thirds would ultimately die; most of those who survived, had lifelong infirmities and pain from their time in the icy waters.

Dorchester survivors told of the wild pandemonium on board when it was hit and began sinking. Many men had not slept in their clothes and life vests as ordered because of the heat in the crowded quarters below. There was panic, fear, terror; death was no abstraction but real, immediate, seemingly inescapable.

The four Chaplains acted together to try bring some order to the chaos, to calm the panic of the troops, to alleviate their fear and terror, to pray with and for them, to help save their lives.

The Chaplains passed out life jackets, helping those too panicked to put them on correctly, until the awful moment arrived when there were no more life jackets to be given out.

It was then that a most remarkable act of heroism, courage, faith, and love took place:

Each of the four Chaplains took off his life jacket, and, knowing that act made death certain, put his life jacket on a soldier who didn’t have one, refusing to listen to any protest that they should not make such a sacrifice.

They continued to help the troops until the last moment.

Then, as the ship sank into the raging sea, the four Chaplains linked hands and arms, and could be seen and heard by the survivors praying together, even singing hymns, joined together in faith, love, and unity, as they sacrificed their lives so “that others might live.”

The few survivors testified to the selfless act of the four Chaplains:

“The ship started sinking and as I left the ship, I looked back and saw the chaplains with their hands clasped, praying for the boys. They never made any attempt to save themselves, but they did try to save the others. I think their names should be on the list of ‘The Greatest Heroes’ of this war,” testified Grady L. Clark.

“I saw all four chaplains take off their life belts and give them to soldiers who had none. The last I saw of them they were still praying, talking, and preaching to the soldiers,” attested survivor Thomas W. Myers Jr.

“It is impressed clearly in my mind that these chaplains demonstrated unsurpassed courage and heroism when they willingly gave their life belts to four enlisted men, who, because of the utter confusion and disorder brought about by the torpedoing, had become hysterical. They helped save the lives of many of the troops,” testified John F. Garey.

These testimonies, taken from author Dan Kurzman’s valuable book “No Greater Glory: The Four Immortal Chaplains and the Sinking of the Dorchester in World War II,” are but some of the sworn statements of grateful survivors upon which Congress awarded the Four Chaplains an unprecedented “Congressional Medal of Valor” in 1961.

Earlier, in 1944, they were awarded Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross. They did not receive the Medal of Honor because of restrictions limiting that medal to combatants. In 2004, delegates to The American Legion National Convention representing 2.7-million wartime veterans, voted to support making an exception and awarding the Medal of Honor to the Four Chaplains.

The lesson of their lives is as inspiring as is the lesson of their ultimate sacrifice. Information is available from a number of sources, principally by the Immortal Chaplains Foundation, and the affiliated Chapel of the Four Chaplains, which awards the Immortal Chaplains Prize for Humanity, and whose logo is: “That others may live.” (www.immortalchaplains.org; The Immortal Chaplains Foundation, On the Queen Mary, 1126

At the dedication of the Chapel of the Four Chaplains in 1951, then-President Harry S. Truman said their sacrifice reflected the fact that “the unity of our country is a unity under God.”

“This interfaith shrine will stand through long generations to teach Americans that as men can die heroically as brothers so should they live together in mutual faith and good will,” President Truman said.

Ben Epstein, a Jewish survivor who often spoke to audiences about the Four Chaplains, was quoted by author Kurzman as describing the meaning of their sacrifice by putting a question to himself, and, thereby, to all other Americans:

“I ask myself, could I do it? Take my life preserver and give it to someone else? Absolutely not. I don’t think I could do it. I didn’t do it. And I ask you in the audience, how many of you could do it? And I don’t want an answer. That’s why I say their bravery; their heroism is beyond belief. That is one of the reasons why we must tell the world what these people did.”

The American Legion has been conducting annual Four Chaplains remembrances for almost half a century, publishes material, and has produced a video, “The American Legion Remembers the Four Chaplains,” all of which are available through its Chaplains Program. (Acy@legion.org; The American Legion, Attn: Chaplains Program, PO Box 1055, Indianapolis, IN 46206 (317-630-1212).

May the God the Four Chaplains served bless and keep them; and may the nation they so heroically served always remember and honor them.

[Rees Lloyd is a longtime civil rights attorney and veterans activist.]

Bernie Giusto: The High Price of Freedom (Is It Time for a No Buy List for Guns?)

In March of 1981, Jodie Foster and President Reagan had three things in common John Hinckley Jr., mental illness and a gun. It was clear in one place that the relationship would need to be tied together in a dramatic way. In that place there was an undeniable need to protect a commitment to one by taking the life of another. In that place a shadow of an idea became an irresistible voice. The voice was not about the need to act but the duty to act.  The place was the mind of John Hinckley. Where the voice became the plan and the plan became the gun.  The motivator and equalizer in the mind of Hinckley was not the gun. In that moment it was his mental illness.

 Despite the best efforts of the world’s best day-to-day Presidential protective agency, the Secret Service, Hinckley’s mental illness won out. The contest was not all that close. That is the thing about mental illness: it does not need plan to be dangerous. In the nearly successful assassination of President Reagan the plan was very complex–walk up to him and shoot. There was no plan to secret himself, no plan to escape, no plan to discard the gun, no plan at all except the duty to act. Consequences are never to be feared in the mind of the mentally ill because they are never part of the plan.
In January of 2011, Senator Gabrielle Giffords and a nine year old who was the future of this country had three things in common, Jared Loughner, mental illness and a gun. And thirty years later the debate about the mentally ill and guns has gone nowhere with any meaningful result. It must be that when it comes to gun possession the cost of freedom is defined by how many times we can fail the mentally unstable. How many times will we pretend the expressed sorrows of a nation pass for meaningful public safety policy discourse.
The circumstances surrounding the shooting in Tucson, Arizona that broke the silence of the New Year again beg us to address the mental illness on the streets of this country in an entirely different way.  The loss of those killed and injured should shake us into realizing that getting bogged down in an argument blaming guns for the consequences will get us no where.  We must act decisively to get guns out of the hands of the mentally unstable before they self identify as the shooter did in Arizona. 

We need to start from a different place than the evil of guns and the instant individual responsibilities of the mentally unstable. Arguing over guilt and guns gets us no where.  We need to get real about getting guns out of the hands of the mentally ill.  Getting real means reframing the Second Amendment debate.  It means putting our fears aside in the interest of a safer America without unduly depriving us of our Second Amendment rights. I mean both the fear that any gun especially any hand gun out there is bad and that any restrictions on access to a hand gun is a plot to disarm the citizenry.


Stop the argument at the extremes and narrow it to protecting the unsuspecting when guns and mental illness come together to kill. Guns don’t kill people but guns we legally placed in the hands of those we know or as the law often says “should know” are a likely danger to others in the uncontrolled environment of the streets.
When high profile gunfire has been involved we are yet to properly honor  the deaths and injuries suffered by victims and their families. Time after time we fail to use the tragedy of the moment to substantively reduce the access to guns by the mentally unstable.  
And there is nothing too general about the term mentally unstable in this context. There are few incidents like the shootings in Arizona that is not proceeded by the shooters actions and statements that clearly warn of the potential for the big trouble that often follows. 
Protecting our nationally prominent elected officials is only a small part of the story. Unfortunately it takes a tragedy of congressional and presidential proportion to give us yet another chance to begin to get this issue right. But so far again we race to the extreme. It does not help when congressional members carrying guns upstage the real issue here.  As if that hype does anything other than to distract us from the task at hand. 
Guns, including handguns, get into lives, homes and onto the streets in four clearly different ways. 
  • Sold by Federally License Firearms Dealers;
  • Sold and traded between private parties including through large venues like gun shows; 
  • Stolen and make their way to the directly street as a result of these crimes or 
  • Originally stolen in one crime are sold, traded or use commit other crimes. 
While this is really a national discussion let’s take it to the streets of Oregon.  As of today someone who is mentally ill–even diagnosed (I didn’t say committed)–can get a gun in Oregon through any one of these avenues. So where do we do we start to limit the access to guns by those uncommitted or yet to be committed mentally ill? Certainly by not allowing the scope of the issue to paralyze us from implementing real legislative change that will have measurable results. 
We start with creating “No Buy Lists” required to be held by federally licensed dealers. Right now the bar is too low for purchasing a firearm. The threshold is the display of seriously unbalanced behavior tinged with violent rhetoric that gets worse overtime. Because they have may not been the subject of a formal mental health process including court commitment, they are free to purchase whatever gun and whatever high capacity ammunition magazine are lawfully available.
That includes from federally licensed dealers.  Yet these dealers in Oregon have the instant ability to check a person’s background which may be used to deny the purchase of a gun. We have the facts at hand that when it comes to the dangerously mentally unstable we need to take the next step.
The problem is that we have been too timid about keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally unstable often at our own peril.  We need to create legally sufficient criteria by which a judge can decide that a person, regardless of a prior formal mental commitment or long term mental health treatment, should not be allowed to buy a gun. We must define a petition process by which law enforcement, family members or mental health professionals without violating privacy protections are able to petition the court for such a prohibition.
Once a court has determined that the criteria has been meet and issues the court order that name becomes part of a No Buy list until a court orders it removed.  This anticipates the right of the person to have a hearing prior to the order being instated. Also the legislation needs to define an appeals process as a remedy to the immediate decision and later to demonstrate to the court that the name should be removed from the No Buy List.
The court process is key to ensuring that the Second Amendment rights of any individual is not put at risk by being falsely labeled as too unstable to buy a gun.  It is also key to give law enforcement a direct method of connecting displayed and persistent unstable behavior, the potential danger they present and the ability to limit their ability to get a gun.
The criteria developed for the court to consider should demonstrate that there is greater potential risk by allowing the purchase of a firearm than is their right to purchase one.  It cannot be so restrictive so that the threshold for making the No Buy List is equal to a civil mental commitment.  That standard would discourage law enforcement from even trying.
As a nation we have decided that certain persons may present too great risk to board an airplane and so we have created No Fly lists. I clearly recognize the difference between the the availability of an airline seat and the right to own a firearm. However the question is less about the right to own a firearm than the right to purchase a gun the first place. After all we would never argue that the undiagnosed,untreated or uncommitted mentally unstable person should be able to buy a gun through a licensed process.
We should also recognize that this in no way puts the firearms out of reach of the mentally unstable.  From the list of access points above obviously there are lots of guns out there. We have to start a meaningful discussion and move in a positive direction now, right now.  To imagine we can take it all on at once is foolhardy and gets us nowhere.  To not take it on at all threatens all of us but especially the mentally ill, their families and their victims. But lets not forget that at some point this issue threatens our Second Amendment rights when it again explodes.
Raising the public policy consciousness of our lawmakers is of value in and of itself. Protecting the rights of gun owners is served when we begin to protect our mentally ill from themselves by starting here with gun purchase from federally licensed dealers.  Finally, we need to find an entry point to fight the good fight of remaking the disgrace of a mental health system we have in this state at least.  The cops need our help to keep the mentally unstable out of jail and out of deadly trouble. We need to help them by giving them a practical tool they can use to make us safer.
Yes, the price of freedom is high. We now must decide what value we place on our freedom and how high a price we willing to pay for our freedoms and why. Because if we wait I guarantee you more guns in the hands of the mentally unstable will find us a nation in sorrow once again.
Bernie Giusto is former Multnomah County Sheriff, former Gresham Police Chief, and a former Oregon State Police Trooper
Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Rees Lloyd: Feb 3rd, Four Chaplains Day

 “Four Chaplains Day” is to be observed annually on February 3 in America by the unanimous resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1988. It is a day to remember February 3, 1943, one of the most remarkable and inspiring acts of heroism in the history of warfare took place in World War II. It is a day to honor the heroism of the Four Chaplains, who selflessly gave their lives  “that others may live.”
However, although veterans in The American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and other veterans organizations,  will hold special observances on Four Chaplains Day, most American media, most American schools,  and, therefore, most Americans, will not observe it. Indeed, most  Americans, including children who will not be taught about in their schools, will  not even know that there is a National Four Chaplains day, or why. This is true  even though, as a former soldier who owed his life to them has said: “[T]heir heroism is beyond belief. That is one of the reasons why we must tell the world what these people did.”.
 
On February 3, 1943, the Dorchester, a converted luxury cruise ship, was transporting Army troops to Greenland, escorted by three Coast Guard Cutters and accompanied by two slow moving freighters.
On board were some 900 troops, and four chaplains, of diverse religions and backgrounds, but of a common faith and commitment to serve God, country, and all the troops, regardless of their religious beliefs, or non-belief. The four Chaplains are:
Rev. George Fox (Methodist); Father John Washington (Roman Catholic); Jewish Rabbi Alexander Goode; and Rev. Clark Poling** (Dutch Reformed).
At approximately 12:55 a.m., in the dead of a freezing night, the Dorchester was hit by a torpedo fired by German U-boat 233 in an area so infested with German submarines it was known as “Torpedo Junction.”

The blast ripped a hole in the ship from below the waterline to the top deck.
The engine room was instantly flooded. Crewmen, who were not scalded to death by steam escaping from broken pipes and the ship’s boiler, were drowned.
Hundreds of troops in the flooded lower compartments were drowned, or washed out to the frigid waters, where most would die.
In less than a minute, the Dorchester lost way, and listed on a 30-degree angle. Troops on deck searched for life jackets in panic, clung to rails and other handholds, saw overloaded life boats overturn in the turgid water, leaped overboard as a last desperate hope for life. Many with life jackets drowned when the life preservers became waterlogged.
Of the 900 troops and crew on board, two-thirds would ultimately die; most of those who survived, had lifelong infirmities and pain from their time in the icy waters.
Dorchester survivors told of the wild pandemonium on board when it was hit and began sinking. Many men had not slept in their clothes and life vests as ordered because of the heat in the crowded quarters below. There was panic, fear, terror; death was no abstraction but real, immediate, seemingly inescapable.
The four Chaplains acted together to try bring some order to the chaos, to calm the panic of the troops, to alleviate their fear and terror, to pray with and for them, to help save their lives.
The Chaplains passed out life jackets, helping those too panicked to put them on correctly, until the awful moment arrived when there were no more life jackets to be given out.
It was then that a most remarkable act of heroism, courage, faith, and love took place:
Each of the four Chaplains took off his life jacket, and, knowing that act made death certain, put his life jacket on a soldier who didn’t have one, refusing to listen to any protest that they should not make such a sacrifice.
They continued to help the troops until the last moment.
Then, as the ship sank into the raging sea, the four Chaplains linked hands and arms, and could be seen and heard by the survivors praying together, even singing hymns, joined together in faith, love, and unity, as they sacrificed their lives so “that others might live.”
The few survivors testified to the selfless act of the four Chaplains:

“The ship started sinking and as I left the ship, I looked back and saw the chaplains with their hands clasped, praying for the boys. They never made any attempt to save themselves, but they did try to save the others. I think their names should be on the list of ‘The Greatest Heroes’ of this war,” testified Grady L. Clark.


“I saw all four chaplains take off their life belts and give them to soldiers who had none. The last I saw of them they were still praying, talking, and preaching to the soldiers,” attested survivor Thomas W. Myers Jr.


“It is impressed clearly in my mind that these chaplains demonstrated unsurpassed courage and heroism when they willingly gave their life belts to four enlisted men, who, because of the utter confusion and disorder brought about by the torpedoing, had become hysterical. They helped save the lives of many of the troops,” testified John F. Garey.


These testimonies, taken from author Dan Kurzman’s valuable book “No Greater Glory: The Four Immortal Chaplains and the Sinking of the Dorchester in World War II,” are but some of the sworn statements of grateful survivors upon which Congress awarded the Four Chaplains an unprecedented “Congressional Medal of Valor” in 1961.

Earlier, in 1944, they were awarded Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross. They did not receive the Medal of Honor because of restrictions limiting that medal to combatants. In 2004, delegates to The American Legion National Convention representing 2.7-million wartime veterans, voted to support making an exception and awarding the Medal of Honor to the Four Chaplains.
The lesson of their lives is as inspiring as is the lesson of their ultimate sacrifice. Information is available from a number of sources, principally by the Immortal Chaplains Foundation, and the affiliated Chapel of the Four Chaplains, which awards the Immortal Chaplains Prize for Humanity, and whose logo is: “That others may live.” (www.immortalchaplains.org; The Immortal Chaplains Foundation, On the Queen Mary , 1126

At the dedication of the Chapel of the Four Chaplains in 1951, then-President Harry S. Truman said their sacrifice reflected the fact that “the unity of our country is a unity under God.”
“This interfaith shrine will stand through long generations to teach Americans that as men can die heroically as brothers so should they live together in mutual faith and good will,” President Truman said.
Ben Epstein, a Jewish survivor who often spoke to audiences about the Four Chaplains, was quoted by author Kurzman as describing the meaning of their sacrifice by putting a question to himself, and, thereby, to all other Americans:

“I ask myself, could I do it? Take my life preserver and give it to someone else? Absolutely not. I don’t think I could do it. I didn’t do it. And I ask you in the audience,  how many of you could do it? And I don’t want an answer. That’s why I say their bravery; their heroism is beyond belief. That is one of the reasons why we must tell the world what these people did.”.


The American Legion has been conducting annual Four Chaplains remembrances for almost half a  century, publishes material, and has produced a video, “The American Legion Remembers the Four Chaplains,” all of which are available through its Chaplains Program. (Acy@legion.org; The American Legion, Attn: Chaplains Program, PO Box 1055, Indianapolis, IN 46206 (317-630-1212).
May the God the Four Chaplains served bless and keep them; and may the nation they so heroically served always remember and honor them.
[Rees Lloyd is a longtime civil rights attorney and veterans activist.]



**Rev. Clark V. Poling  was the son of famed evangelist Daniel A. Poling of Portland, OR, who had served as a Chaplain in WWI. Rev. Daniel Poling was an Evangelical Minister at the beginning of his career, and was rebaptized as a Baptist Minister in 1936. That same year, his son, Clark, graduated from Yale with a divinity degree, and was ordained a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church. 
When WWII broke out, Rev. Clark Poling decided to follow in his father’s footsteps and serve as a Chaplain to soldiers. His famous father, Rev. Daniel Poling, warned his son that Chaplains in WWI “sustained the highest mortality rate of all military personnel.”
Rev. Clark Poling was undeterred, and attained Chaplains School at Harvard with Chaplains Fox, Goode, and Washington, with whom he would heroically go to his death so “that others may live”
Ironically, not one of the Four Chaplains could be trained by the Army at Harvard today. Harvard,  despite its founding by Christians to perpetuate Christianity, barred ROTC from Harvard under the leadership of liberal progressive Elena Kagan. Today, she sits on the U.S. Supreme Court, by appointment of liberal progressive President Barack Hussein Obama, while the Four Chaplains would be persona non grata at Harvard, not withstanding that both Kagan and Obama, who never deigned to serve,  owe their freedom to military men and women like the heroic Four Chaplains.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com