Monthly Archives: May 2010

Memorial Day, 2010. Remember.

1000 Flags Representing Oregon’s fallen at Waterfront Park
Arlington National Cemetery. LAT Photo.

Reposting Lew’s piece from earlier this week in honor of our soliders, guardsmen, marines, airmen, coast guardsmen.

DON’T YOU REMEMBER US? 
By Lew Waters
I remember that day long ago when I decided to join the Military. I know you can’t remember that day, but I do. I hoped I might not have to travel half way around the world to fight in that war long ago.
You looked proud of me then, but I could see the fear in your eyes. I could feel the apprehension inside of me, fear of the unknown, Basic Training, maybe fighting. But I went because it was the right thing to do.
I remember feeling so proud to put on the uniform and have my photo taken during Basic Training and how in your letter you said I looked all grown up and how proud you were of me.

I remember completing Basic and being sent off for more training in the skill the Military would assign me to do and the day towards the end when my orders came that I was being sent off to that far away land. I was going to war to help preserve someone else’s freedom and stand against those who would oppress others.

I came home for a short leave and asked you to marry me, but you said no, not at this time. We were too young and I would be gone too long, we should wait. 
I kissed you goodbye and hugged you, not wanting to let go, but I did.
I remember landing in the airplane and after being processed into this far away land, being sent off to the unit that would be my home for the next year. My fear did not subside, but I learned to hide it well, just as all the others did.
I remember that year as if it were yesterday, the horrors I saw, the sounds I heard, the acrid smells around me. But I was doing what must be done to preserve freedom, not only for those we fought for, but for you and those who would come along after us.
I came home and you were there to greet me with open arms. Your tears told me you had really missed me and now, it was you that couldn’t wait to be married to me, even though you knew I was to return as soon as my leave was finished.
I remember you in your white gown and me in my Dress Uniform, now sporting a few medals.
I remember our first kiss as man and wife and looking into your eyes, seeing how much you loved me and the fear of my returning to war seemed less than before.
Our time together as married was too short, but I had to return. I had a job to finish and finishing meant you would be protected in the years ahead as would any children we would have later.
I remember your letter telling me I was going to be a ‘Daddy,’ and to be careful. I was so proud and wanted to be there to show you.
Another year would soon be up and I had been careful so I would return to you. I beamed with pride when I received your letter and saw the photo you sent of you holding our newborn child. It would only be weeks now and I would be back with you, a civilian again, my job and time served completed. I will have served my country with honor.
I remember hearing the rapid popping noise like firecrackers, but knew the sound of an AK-47. The sirens went off, things began exploding around me and I remember thinking how this can’t be happening, not now, I’m too short for this, I want to hold my child and my wife.

Something hit me, once, then twice, and then a third time and it burned. It knocked me down and I couldn’t get up, everything was blurry but became peaceful and quiet. Then it all went black.

I don’t know how they told you or how much you wept when they came to tell you what happened to me, but I saw you at my funeral, sitting there all dressed in black and the tears streaming down your cheeks. You had our child with you and my parents where there, also weeping. I tried to wipe the tears off your cheek and tell you that I was okay, there was no more pain.
You cried as they handed you the folded flag and could barely stand as they lowered me into the ground.
I was pleased that you placed the flag in an oak case along with my medals and a photo of me. I was happy to see you find a new love and remarry and watched from afar as you had more children and your new husband accepted our child as his own.
I heard as you and your husband told our child about me and what I paid so that others could be free and I could see that he too was growing into a fine young man. I was even proud when he too decided to don the uniform of the United States of America and even when he decided to make a career out of the Military.
I remember every Memorial Day when you and your new family came to the ceremony to pay respects to all of us up here. We were there behind the podium then spread out among the crowd that gathered. We all wanted to tell you that we loved you and that we could never forget you. You were the reason we sacrificed as we did and we would gladly do it again.
I remember how as children, we watched as every Memorial Day a parade was held. Aging Veterans marched proudly through the center of town. Some in wheelchairs, some hobbling along, but all proudly wearing the uniform they once wore daily.
The parades seem to be a thing of the past, though. Replaced by yearly ceremonies. I was troubled that the crowds every year became smaller and less people came. Backyard barbecues and merchant sales began taking over for people stopping by the Memorial in town where you all once came to pay your respects.
Then came that fateful day in 2001, September to be exact, when airplanes were flown into buildings and many people died. We knew our numbers would be growing soon and prepared to greet new arrivals.
I watched as once again the numbers at Memorial Day ceremonies grew and we gathered there with you, happy to see faces we hadn’t seen in years.
I wasn’t prepared to greet our son, but he knew who I was right away even though he had never met me. We hugged long and hard, the hug I had wanted to give him so long ago.
We traveled together as once again; we saw you accepting a folded flag, this time for our son and you placed it alongside of mine.
We were together that day and every Memorial Day when you, along with his brothers and sisters came to the Veterans Memorial in town to hear the speeches and to say how much you missed us that first couple of years.
But, you weren’t there last the couple of years. What happened? Did we make you mad? Did the pain of remembering us become too great? Did you listen to those voices screaming out how wrong we were for going or believe them as they said we were the bad guys? We see you at home in your backyard. 
Grandchildren are there now, along with friends and neighbors and you are laughing, playing games, having fun. Our folded flags have gathered dust and are in a box.
Have we been forgotten?
There are so few of you that still come. We hear far too few words of thanks any more. We are happy that you can enjoy life and we miss being there with you, enjoying it too.
Our Memorials are being vandalized, stolen and neglected. Many have fallen into disrepair, so few stopping by today. Our Memorials are under assault and 
Courts are deciding to tear them down, falsely claiming them to be religious symbols and you aren’t speaking out.
We miss you and think of you every day. We know what the price of freedom is as we paid the high price and would gladly do it again.

We remember you. Don’t you remember us?
Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Memorial Day, 2010. Remember.

1000 Flags Representing Oregon’s fallen at Waterfront Park
Arlington National Cemetery. LAT Photo.

Reposting Lew’s piece from earlier this week in honor of our soliders, guardsmen, marines, airmen, coast guardsmen.

DON’T YOU REMEMBER US? 
By Lew Waters
I remember that day long ago when I decided to join the Military. I know you can’t remember that day, but I do. I hoped I might not have to travel half way around the world to fight in that war long ago.
You looked proud of me then, but I could see the fear in your eyes. I could feel the apprehension inside of me, fear of the unknown, Basic Training, maybe fighting. But I went because it was the right thing to do.
I remember feeling so proud to put on the uniform and have my photo taken during Basic Training and how in your letter you said I looked all grown up and how proud you were of me.

I remember completing Basic and being sent off for more training in the skill the Military would assign me to do and the day towards the end when my orders came that I was being sent off to that far away land. I was going to war to help preserve someone else’s freedom and stand against those who would oppress others.

I came home for a short leave and asked you to marry me, but you said no, not at this time. We were too young and I would be gone too long, we should wait. 
I kissed you goodbye and hugged you, not wanting to let go, but I did.
I remember landing in the airplane and after being processed into this far away land, being sent off to the unit that would be my home for the next year. My fear did not subside, but I learned to hide it well, just as all the others did.
I remember that year as if it were yesterday, the horrors I saw, the sounds I heard, the acrid smells around me. But I was doing what must be done to preserve freedom, not only for those we fought for, but for you and those who would come along after us.
I came home and you were there to greet me with open arms. Your tears told me you had really missed me and now, it was you that couldn’t wait to be married to me, even though you knew I was to return as soon as my leave was finished.
I remember you in your white gown and me in my Dress Uniform, now sporting a few medals.
I remember our first kiss as man and wife and looking into your eyes, seeing how much you loved me and the fear of my returning to war seemed less than before.
Our time together as married was too short, but I had to return. I had a job to finish and finishing meant you would be protected in the years ahead as would any children we would have later.
I remember your letter telling me I was going to be a ‘Daddy,’ and to be careful. I was so proud and wanted to be there to show you.
Another year would soon be up and I had been careful so I would return to you. I beamed with pride when I received your letter and saw the photo you sent of you holding our newborn child. It would only be weeks now and I would be back with you, a civilian again, my job and time served completed. I will have served my country with honor.
I remember hearing the rapid popping noise like firecrackers, but knew the sound of an AK-47. The sirens went off, things began exploding around me and I remember thinking how this can’t be happening, not now, I’m too short for this, I want to hold my child and my wife.

Something hit me, once, then twice, and then a third time and it burned. It knocked me down and I couldn’t get up, everything was blurry but became peaceful and quiet. Then it all went black.

I don’t know how they told you or how much you wept when they came to tell you what happened to me, but I saw you at my funeral, sitting there all dressed in black and the tears streaming down your cheeks. You had our child with you and my parents where there, also weeping. I tried to wipe the tears off your cheek and tell you that I was okay, there was no more pain.
You cried as they handed you the folded flag and could barely stand as they lowered me into the ground.
I was pleased that you placed the flag in an oak case along with my medals and a photo of me. I was happy to see you find a new love and remarry and watched from afar as you had more children and your new husband accepted our child as his own.
I heard as you and your husband told our child about me and what I paid so that others could be free and I could see that he too was growing into a fine young man. I was even proud when he too decided to don the uniform of the United States of America and even when he decided to make a career out of the Military.
I remember every Memorial Day when you and your new family came to the ceremony to pay respects to all of us up here. We were there behind the podium then spread out among the crowd that gathered. We all wanted to tell you that we loved you and that we could never forget you. You were the reason we sacrificed as we did and we would gladly do it again.
I remember how as children, we watched as every Memorial Day a parade was held. Aging Veterans marched proudly through the center of town. Some in wheelchairs, some hobbling along, but all proudly wearing the uniform they once wore daily.
The parades seem to be a thing of the past, though. Replaced by yearly ceremonies. I was troubled that the crowds every year became smaller and less people came. Backyard barbecues and merchant sales began taking over for people stopping by the Memorial in town where you all once came to pay your respects.
Then came that fateful day in 2001, September to be exact, when airplanes were flown into buildings and many people died. We knew our numbers would be growing soon and prepared to greet new arrivals.
I watched as once again the numbers at Memorial Day ceremonies grew and we gathered there with you, happy to see faces we hadn’t seen in years.
I wasn’t prepared to greet our son, but he knew who I was right away even though he had never met me. We hugged long and hard, the hug I had wanted to give him so long ago.
We traveled together as once again; we saw you accepting a folded flag, this time for our son and you placed it alongside of mine.
We were together that day and every Memorial Day when you, along with his brothers and sisters came to the Veterans Memorial in town to hear the speeches and to say how much you missed us that first couple of years.
But, you weren’t there last the couple of years. What happened? Did we make you mad? Did the pain of remembering us become too great? Did you listen to those voices screaming out how wrong we were for going or believe them as they said we were the bad guys? We see you at home in your backyard. 
Grandchildren are there now, along with friends and neighbors and you are laughing, playing games, having fun. Our folded flags have gathered dust and are in a box.
Have we been forgotten?
There are so few of you that still come. We hear far too few words of thanks any more. We are happy that you can enjoy life and we miss being there with you, enjoying it too.
Our Memorials are being vandalized, stolen and neglected. Many have fallen into disrepair, so few stopping by today. Our Memorials are under assault and 
Courts are deciding to tear them down, falsely claiming them to be religious symbols and you aren’t speaking out.
We miss you and think of you every day. We know what the price of freedom is as we paid the high price and would gladly do it again.

We remember you. Don’t you remember us?
Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Thank You.

 A 5th Listener, Roy Widing, wrote this poem:

One Soldier’s Life

                                                               John 15:13-14

On a cold and rainy evening

Near an old and sunken grave                                               

Sounds a trumpet’s simple, solemn tune

Respects paid to the brave

Mere interest on a huge debt owed

For the biggest sacrifice

Through terror, sorrow, untold pain

Fire, smoke and ice

This soldier, many never knew

But he was someone’s son

And gave the promise of his youth

Now he’s the greater one

His battleground was far from home

He fought to keep us free

While many men spend lives on self

This man gave his for me

So many never made it back

They rest on foreign soil

Such gallant men I’ll not forget

For they define what’s loyal

Graves very often mention

The place where brave men fell

For others, we may never know

As only God can tell

Location matters little

For lives they nobly gave

Near forest, field or desert

In air, or watery grave

This young man               

Left his loved ones home

War pulled those lives apart

And left his fractured family

With but a broken heart

One soldier’s life speaks loud for those

Now silent through the years

This brave man’s sacred resting place

I wash with grateful tears 

                       
by Roy Widing

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

DON’T YOU REMEMBER US?

I remember that day long ago when I decided to join the Military. I know you can’t remember that day, but I do. I hoped I might not have to travel half way around the world to fight in that war long ago.

You looked proud of me then, but I could see the fear in your eyes. I could feel the apprehension inside of me, fear of the unknown, Basic Training, maybe fighting. But I went because it was the right thing to do.

I remember feeling so proud to put on the uniform and have my photo taken during Basic Training and how in your letter you said I looked all grown up and how proud you were of me.

I remember completing Basic and being sent off for more training in the skill the Military would assign me to do and the day towards the end when my orders came that I was being sent off to that far away land. I was going to war to help preserve someone else’s freedom and stand against those who would oppress others.

I came home for a short leave and asked you to marry me, but you said no, not at this time. We were too young and I would be gone too long, we should wait. I kissed you goodbye and hugged you, not wanting to let go, but I did.

I remember landing in the airplane and after being processed into this far away land, being sent off to the unit that would be my home for the next year. My fear did not subside, but I learned to hide it well, just as all the others did.

I remember that year as if it were yesterday, the horrors I saw, the sounds I heard, the acrid smells around me. But I was doing what must be done to preserve freedom, not only for those we fought for, but for you and those who would come along after us.

I came home and you were there to greet me with open arms. Your tears told me you had really missed me and now, it was you that couldn’t wait to be married to me, even though you knew I was to return as soon as my leave was finished.

I remember you in your white gown and me in my Dress Uniform, now sporting a few medals.

I remember our first kiss as man and wife and looking into your eyes, seeing how much you loved me and the fear of my returning to war seemed less than before.

Our time together as married was too short, but I had to return. I had a job to finish and finishing meant you would be protected in the years ahead as would any children we would have later.

I remember your letter telling me I was going to be a ‘Daddy,’ and to be careful. I was so proud and wanted to be there to show you.

Another year would soon be up and I had been careful so I would return to you. I beamed with pride when I received your letter and saw the photo you sent of you holding our newborn child. It would only be weeks now and I would be back with you, a civilian again, my job and time served completed. I will have served my country with honor.

I remember hearing the rapid popping noise like firecrackers, but knew the sound of an AK-47. The sirens went off, things began exploding around me and I remember thinking how this can’t be happening, not now, I’m too short for this, I want to hold my child and my wife.

Something hit me, once, then twice, and then a third time and it burned. It knocked me down and I couldn’t get up, everything was blurry but became peaceful and quiet. Then it all went black.

I don’t know how they told you or how much you wept when they came to tell you what happened to me, but I saw you at my funeral, sitting there all dressed in black and the tears streaming down your cheeks. You had our child with you and my parents where there, also weeping. I tried to wipe the tears off your cheek and tell you that I was okay, there was no more pain.

You cried as they handed you the folded flag and could barely stand as they lowered me into the ground.

I was pleased that you placed the flag in an oak case along with my medals and a photo of me. I was happy to see you find a new love and remarry and watched from afar as you had more children and your new husband accepted our child as his own.

I heard as you and your husband told our child about me and what I paid so that others could be free and I could see that he too was growing into a fine young man. I was even proud when he too decided to don the uniform of the United States of America and even when he decided to make a career out of the Military.

I remember every Memorial Day when you and your new family came to the ceremony to pay respects to all of us up here. We were there behind the podium then spread out among the crowd that gathered. We all wanted to tell you that we loved you and that we could never forget you. You were the reason we sacrificed as we did and we would gladly do it again.

I remember how as children, we watched as every Memorial Day a parade was held. Aging Veterans marched proudly through the center of town. Some in wheelchairs, some hobbling along, but all proudly wearing the uniform they once wore daily.

The parades seem to be a thing of the past, though. Replaced by yearly ceremonies. I was troubled that the crowds every year became smaller and less people came. Backyard barbecues and merchant sales began taking over for people stopping by the Memorial in town where you all once came to pay your respects.

Then came that fateful day in 2001, September to be exact, when airplanes were flown into buildings and many people died. We knew our numbers would be growing soon and prepared to greet new arrivals.

I watched as once again the numbers at Memorial Day ceremonies grew and we gathered there with you, happy to see faces we hadn’t seen in years.

I wasn’t prepared to greet our son, but he knew who I was right away even though he had never met me. We hugged long and hard, the hug I had wanted to give him so long ago.

We traveled together as once again; we saw you accepting a folded flag, this time for our son and you placed it alongside of mine.

We were together that day and every Memorial Day when you, along with his brothers and sisters came to the Veterans Memorial in town to hear the speeches and to say how much you missed us that first couple of years.

But, you weren’t there last the couple of years. What happened? Did we make you mad? Did the pain of remembering us become too great? Did you listen to those voices screaming out how wrong we were for going or believe them as they said we were the bad guys? We see you at home in your backyard. Grandchildren are there now, along with friends and neighbors and you are laughing, playing games, having fun. Our folded flags have gathered dust and are in a box.

Have we been forgotten?

There are so few of you that still come. We hear far too few words of thanks any more. We are happy that you can enjoy life and we miss being there with you, enjoying it too.

Our Memorials are being vandalized, stolen and neglected. Many have fallen into disrepair, so few stopping by today. Our Memorials are under assault and Courts are deciding to tear them down, falsely claiming them to be religious symbols and you aren’t speaking out.

We miss you and think of you every day. We know what the price of freedom is as we paid the high price and would gladly do it again.

We remember you. Don’t you remember us?

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Memorial Day 2010: A Reminder by Rees Lloyd

MEMORIAL DAY 2010:

A  time to remember the price of our freedom, 
and the veterans who paid that price…

American Wars Killed In Action

Revolutionary War…………..  25, 324

War of 1812………………………      2,260

Mexican American War……  13,283

Civil War……………………….. 650,000

Spanish American War……..      7,166

World War I………………………. 116,708

World War II……………………. 408,306

Korean War………………………     54,246

Vietnam War ……………………    58,223

Persian Gulf War………………       363
(Desert Storm)

Operation Iraqi Freedom…..       4,387

Operation Enduring Freedom     1,044
(Afghanistan)

All Other Conflicts since
the Revolutionary War……….     8, 330

Islamist jihadist terrorism…….     3,336
(9-11-2001)

TOTAL:…………………………….    1,352,975

The Soldier

It is the soldier, not the reporter, 
who has given us freedom of the press.
It is the soldier, not the poet, 
who has given us freedom of speech.
It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, 
who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.
It is the soldier, not the lawyer, 
who has given us the right to a fair trial.
It is the soldier, 
who salutes the flag, 
who serves under the flag, 
and whose coffin is draped by the flag, 
who allows the protester to burn the flag.
[By Father Dennis Edward O’Brien, USMC]


Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Thank You.

 A 5th Listener, Roy Widing, wrote this poem:

One Soldier’s Life

                                                               John 15:13-14

On a cold and rainy evening

Near an old and sunken grave                                               

Sounds a trumpet’s simple, solemn tune

Respects paid to the brave

Mere interest on a huge debt owed

For the biggest sacrifice

Through terror, sorrow, untold pain

Fire, smoke and ice

This soldier, many never knew

But he was someone’s son

And gave the promise of his youth

Now he’s the greater one

His battleground was far from home

He fought to keep us free

While many men spend lives on self

This man gave his for me

So many never made it back

They rest on foreign soil

Such gallant men I’ll not forget

For they define what’s loyal

Graves very often mention

The place where brave men fell

For others, we may never know

As only God can tell

Location matters little

For lives they nobly gave

Near forest, field or desert

In air, or watery grave

This young man               

Left his loved ones home

War pulled those lives apart

And left his fractured family

With but a broken heart

One soldier’s life speaks loud for those

Now silent through the years

This brave man’s sacred resting place

I wash with grateful tears 

                       
by Roy Widing

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Oregon Irony: CAIR Demands Action on Possible "Hate" Crime

By Victoria Taft and Rees Lloyd
The Council on American-Islamic Relations is asking the FBI to enter the local investigation into an incendiary device found inside the Tigard home of Muslims from Afghanistan last Sunday morning. The device, which included a timer and accelerant, was found by one of the occupants of the home when he woke up. He threw the device out of the home. 
I’m sure CAIR, as it’s known, wants to convey the idea that this incident is a possible “hate” crime and this was an attempt to go after Muslims. But let’s be clear about what kind of organization we’re supposed to be taking our marching orders from.
In a story in the Zero (here) CAIR attempts to make its case claiming that anti Muslim rhetoric has grown,

“Given recent events and the rise in anti-Islam rhetoric nationwide, we
urge the FBI to add its resources to those of local and state authorities to
investigate a possible bias motive for this troubling incident,” CAIR
Legislative Director Corey Saylor said in a statement released Tuesday.

Religious intolerance of any kind is anathema. Turning that intolerance into violence is a crime and should be punished.
But to what rise in anti Islam rhetoric is CAIR referring? Is it to the repudiation of radical Islamists in New York who threatened the producers of South Park for depicting an image of Mohammed? Is it the repudiation of the Muslim radical who mowed down 13 people at Fort Hood? Is this the “anti Islam” rhetoric CAIR refers to? 
Look at how the Oregonian depicts this organization! The reporter dutifully transcribes what CAIR SAYS its mission is:

CAIR, a nationwide Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization that
strives to elevate understanding and knowledge of Islam and empower American
Muslims
 

But who is CAIR kidding? And why didn’t the Zero do its work?
As Andy McCarthy writes in his new book, “The Grand Jihad: How Islam and the Left Sabotage America,” CAIR is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Islamic Association of Palestine, an outgrowth of the Muslim Brotherhood. He writes, 

…CAIR was already in existence and firmly in the Brotherhood fold even before its incorporation was announced. We know that because, in preparing for a scheduled July 30, 1994 meeting, the Palestine Committee prepared a written agenda that was later seized by the FBI. It stated that a top discussion topic would be “suggestions to develop work” for several named “organizations.” Included among these was “CAIR,” as well as the IAP, HLF, and UASR (i.e., the United Association for Studies and Research). The agenda elucidated that “complete coordination” was sought among the various groups. Critically, it stressed that the effort was under Brotherhood direction: “This is not a separate movement from the mother Group.”

The likes of CAIR presumes to tell us and law enforcement about “anti Islam” rhetoric and what constitutes a “hate” crime? Tell that the UCSD student, a member of the Muslim Student Union 9another Muslim Brotherhood group) who organized a “Hitler” and “Israel Apartheid” week on campus what constitutes a “hate” crime. Watch her exchange with David Horowitz below.
As Horowitz points out in his websites Discover the Networks and Jihad Watch here and here, CAIR has plenty of first hand knowledge about “hate” crimes.

Notable facts about CAIR’s pas de deux with Islamic extremism and terrorism include the following:

  • Co-founder Nihad Awad asserted at a 1994 meeting at Barry University, “I am a supporter of the Hamas movement.” Awad wrote in the Muslim World Monitor that the 1994 trial which had resulted in the conviction of four Islamic fundamentalist terrorists who had perpetrated the previous year’s World Trade Center bombing was “a travesty of justice.”
  • On February 2, 1995, U.S. Attorney Mary Jo White named CAIR Advisory Board member and New York imam Siraj Wahhaj as one of the “unindicted persons who may be alleged as co-conspirators” in Islamic Group leader Omar Abdel Rahman‘s foiled plot to blow up numerous New York City monuments.

  • On June 6, 2006, CAIR’s Ohio affiliate held a large fundraiser in honor of Siraj Wahhaj. Following the event, CAIR-Ohio issued a press release heralding the more than $100,000 that Wahhaj had helped raise that evening for the organization’s “civil liberties work.”

  • In October 1998, CAIR demanded the removal of a Los Angeles billboard describing Osama bin Laden as “the sworn enemy.” According to CAIR, this depiction was “offensive to Muslims.”
  • In 1998, CAIR denied bin Laden’s responsibility for the two al Qaeda bombings of American embassies in Africa. According to Ibrahim Hooper, the bombings resulted from “misunderstandings of both sides.”
  • In September 2003, CAIR’s former Community Affairs Director, Bassem Khafagi, pled guilty to three federal counts of bank and visa fraud and agreed to be deported to Egypt. Federal investigators said that a group Khafagi founded, the Islamic Assembly of North America, had funneled money to activities supporting terrorism and had published material advocating suicide attacks against the United States. Khafagi’s illegal activities took place while he was employed by CAIR.
  • In July 2004, Ghassan Elashi, a founding Board member of CAIR’s Texas chapter, was convicted along with his four brothers of having illegally shipped computers from their Dallas-area business, InfoCom Corporation, to Libya and Syria, two designated state sponsors of terrorism. That same month, Elashi was charged with having provided more than $12.4 million to Hamas while he was running HLF. In April 2005, Elashi and two of his brothers were also convicted of knowingly doing business with Hamas operative Mousa Abu Marzook, who was Elashi’s brother-in-law. Elashi’s illegal activities took place while he was employed by CAIR, whose Dallas-Fort Worth chapter depicted the Elashis’ indictment as “a war on Islam and Muslims.”
  • On September 6, 2001, the day that federal agents first raided Infocom’s headquarters, CAIR Executive Director Nihad Awad denounced the U.S. government for “tak[ing] us back to the McCarthy era.” 
  • FBI wiretap evidence which was introduced during the 2007 trial of the Holy Land Foundation (a trial that explored HLF’s financial ties to Hamas), proved that Nihad Awad had attended a 1993 Philadelphia meeting of Hamas leaders and operatives who collaborated on a plan to disguise funding for Hamas as charitable donations.
  • CAIR co-founder and Chairman Emeritus Omar Ahmad was named, in the same 2007 Holy Land Foundation trial, as an unindicted co-conspirator with HLF. During the trial, evidence was supplied proving that Ahmad had attended, along with Nihad Awad, the aforementioned 1993 Philadelphia meeting of Hamas leaders and operatives. Moreover, prosecutors described Ahmad as a member of the Muslim Brotherhood‘s “Palestine Committee” in America.
  • The home of Muthanna al-Hanooti, one of CAIR’s directors, was raided in 2006 by FBI agents in connection with an active terrorism investigation. FBI agents also searched the offices of Focus on Advocacy and Advancement of International Relations, al-Hanooti’s Michigan- and Washington DC-based consulting firm that investigators suspect to be a front supporting the Sunni-led insurgency in Iraq.
  • Al-Hanooti is an ethnic Palestinian who, according to a 2001 FBI report, “collected over $6 million for support of Hamas” and attended, along with CAIR and Holy Land Foundation officials, the previously cited Hamas fundraising summit in Philadelphia in 1993. Currently a prayer leader at a Washington-area mosque that aided some of the 9/11 hijackers, he is a relative of Shiek Mohammed al-Hanooti, an unindicted co-conspirator in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. Muthanna al-Hanooti formerly helped run an organization called LIFE for Relief and Development, a suspected Hamas terror front whose Michigan offices were raided by the FBI in September 2006, and whose Baghdad office was raided by U.S. troops in 2004.
  • Randall Todd Royer, who served as a communications specialist and civil rights coordinator for CAIR, trained with Lashkar-I-Taiba, an al Qaeda-tied Kashmir organization that is listed on the State Department’s international terror list. He was also indicted on charges of conspiring to help al Qaeda and the Taliban battle American troops in Afghanistan. He later pled guilty to lesser firearm-related charges and was sentenced to twenty years in prison.  Royer’s illegal activities took place while he was employed by CAIR.
  • Onetime CAIR fundraiser Rabih Haddad was arrested on terrorism-related charges and was deported from the United States due to his subsequent work as Executive Director of the Global Relief Foundation, which in October 2002 was designated by the U.S. Treasury Department for financing al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations.  
  • During the 2005 trial of Sami Al-Arian, who was a key figure for Palestinian Islamic Jihad in the United States, Ahmed Bedier of CAIR’s Florida branch emerged as one of Al-Arian’s most vocal advocates.
  • In the aftermath of 9/11, federal agents raided the Washington-area home of CAIR civil rights coordinator Laura Jaghlit as part of a probe into terrorist financing, money laundering and tax fraud. Her husband Mohammed Jaghlit, a director of the Saudi-backed SAAR Foundation, is a suspect in the still-active (as of January 2008) investigation.
  • Abdurahman Alamoudi, one of CAIR’s former directors, is a supporter of both Hamas and Hezbollah, and is currently serving a 23-year prison sentence for terrorism-related convictions.
  • Current CAIR board member Nabil Sadoun co-founded, along with Mousa Abu Marzook, the United Association for Studies and Research (UASR), which investigators consider to be a key Hamas front in America. Sadoun now sits on UASR’s board.
  • Current CAIR research director Mohamed Nimer previously served as a Board Director for UASR.
  • One of CAIR’s founding directors, Rafeeq Jaber, is a supporter of Hezbollah and served as the longtime President of the Islamic Association for Palestine.
  • CAIR Board member Hamza Yusuf was investigated by the FBI shortly after 9/11 because, just two days before the attacks, he had told a Muslim audience: “This country [the U.S.] is facing a terrible fate and the reason for that is because this country stands condemned. It stands condemned like Europe stood condemned because of what it did. And lest people forget, Europe suffered two world wars after conquering the Muslim lands.”



    And CAIR has a vision for what the United States should become,

     CAIR promotes a radical Islamic vision, as evidenced by the fact that its co-founder Omar Ahmad told a Fremont, California audience in July 1998: “Islam isn’t in America to be equal to any other faith, but to become dominant. The Koran … should be the highest authority in America, and Islam the only accepted religion on Earth.” In a similar spirit, co-founder Ibrahim Hooper told a reporter in 1993: “I wouldn’t want to create the impression that I wouldn’t like the government of the United States to be Islamic sometime in the future.” In 2003 Hooper stated that if Muslims ever become a majority in the United States, they will likely seek to replace the U.S. Constitution with Islamic law, which they deem superior to man-made law. In the late 1980s, Ihsan Bagby, who would later become a CAIR Board member, stated that Muslims “can never be full citizens of this country,” referring to the United States, “because there is no way we can be fully committed to the institutions and ideologies of this country.”

    Rees Lloyd adds,


    I believe you interviewed on your show David Gaubatz, co-author with Paul Sherry of the CAIR expose: “Muslim Mafia, Inside the Secret Underworld That’s Conspiring To Islamize America,” a book based upon documents and evidence obtained by Gaubatz’  son, Chris, who became an intern and then volunteer staff member at CAIR in its headquarters office, working with its highest officers, including CAIR’s chief propagandist, Ibrahim Hooper. It ought to be read by every Oregonian before they decide to embrace CAIR or believe its representations of being merely a “civil rights organization” desiring to be fully Americans.

    The truth, as stated by Omar Ahmad, co-founder, first president, and former member of the board of CAIR:
    “Islam isn’t in America to be equal to any other faith, but to become dominant. The Quran should be the highest authority.” He is not talking about “religious” authority but governance. That, is the Quran, not the U.S. Constitution, should be the “highest authority” of governance.
    Among other things reported in Muslim Mafia:
     “Ever since Hamas was designated a foreign terrorist organization in 1995, it’s been illegal to provide support to it within the U.S. ….In federal court documents, prosecutors have explicitly stated that CAIR is part of the pro-jihad, anti-U.S. Muslim Broherhood and its U.S. network to benefit Hamas and other terrorists. Their language has been plain and unambiguous, yet the mainstream media have still managed to ignore their alarming conclusion.
    “From its founding [in 1994] by Muslim Brotherhood leaders, CAIR conspired with other affiliates of the Muslim Brotherhod to support terrorists.” (U.S. Justice Department “Brief for the United States,” in USA v. Sabri Benkahla (Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, December 2007).

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    DON’T YOU REMEMBER US?

    I remember that day long ago when I decided to join the Military. I know you can’t remember that day, but I do. I hoped I might not have to travel half way around the world to fight in that war long ago.

    You looked proud of me then, but I could see the fear in your eyes. I could feel the apprehension inside of me, fear of the unknown, Basic Training, maybe fighting. But I went because it was the right thing to do.

    I remember feeling so proud to put on the uniform and have my photo taken during Basic Training and how in your letter you said I looked all grown up and how proud you were of me.

    I remember completing Basic and being sent off for more training in the skill the Military would assign me to do and the day towards the end when my orders came that I was being sent off to that far away land. I was going to war to help preserve someone else’s freedom and stand against those who would oppress others.

    I came home for a short leave and asked you to marry me, but you said no, not at this time. We were too young and I would be gone too long, we should wait. I kissed you goodbye and hugged you, not wanting to let go, but I did.

    I remember landing in the airplane and after being processed into this far away land, being sent off to the unit that would be my home for the next year. My fear did not subside, but I learned to hide it well, just as all the others did.

    I remember that year as if it were yesterday, the horrors I saw, the sounds I heard, the acrid smells around me. But I was doing what must be done to preserve freedom, not only for those we fought for, but for you and those who would come along after us.

    I came home and you were there to greet me with open arms. Your tears told me you had really missed me and now, it was you that couldn’t wait to be married to me, even though you knew I was to return as soon as my leave was finished.

    I remember you in your white gown and me in my Dress Uniform, now sporting a few medals.

    I remember our first kiss as man and wife and looking into your eyes, seeing how much you loved me and the fear of my returning to war seemed less than before.

    Our time together as married was too short, but I had to return. I had a job to finish and finishing meant you would be protected in the years ahead as would any children we would have later.

    I remember your letter telling me I was going to be a ‘Daddy,’ and to be careful. I was so proud and wanted to be there to show you.

    Another year would soon be up and I had been careful so I would return to you. I beamed with pride when I received your letter and saw the photo you sent of you holding our newborn child. It would only be weeks now and I would be back with you, a civilian again, my job and time served completed. I will have served my country with honor.

    I remember hearing the rapid popping noise like firecrackers, but knew the sound of an AK-47. The sirens went off, things began exploding around me and I remember thinking how this can’t be happening, not now, I’m too short for this, I want to hold my child and my wife.

    Something hit me, once, then twice, and then a third time and it burned. It knocked me down and I couldn’t get up, everything was blurry but became peaceful and quiet. Then it all went black.

    I don’t know how they told you or how much you wept when they came to tell you what happened to me, but I saw you at my funeral, sitting there all dressed in black and the tears streaming down your cheeks. You had our child with you and my parents where there, also weeping. I tried to wipe the tears off your cheek and tell you that I was okay, there was no more pain.

    You cried as they handed you the folded flag and could barely stand as they lowered me into the ground.

    I was pleased that you placed the flag in an oak case along with my medals and a photo of me. I was happy to see you find a new love and remarry and watched from afar as you had more children and your new husband accepted our child as his own.

    I heard as you and your husband told our child about me and what I paid so that others could be free and I could see that he too was growing into a fine young man. I was even proud when he too decided to don the uniform of the United States of America and even when he decided to make a career out of the Military.

    I remember every Memorial Day when you and your new family came to the ceremony to pay respects to all of us up here. We were there behind the podium then spread out among the crowd that gathered. We all wanted to tell you that we loved you and that we could never forget you. You were the reason we sacrificed as we did and we would gladly do it again.

    I remember how as children, we watched as every Memorial Day a parade was held. Aging Veterans marched proudly through the center of town. Some in wheelchairs, some hobbling along, but all proudly wearing the uniform they once wore daily.

    The parades seem to be a thing of the past, though. Replaced by yearly ceremonies. I was troubled that the crowds every year became smaller and less people came. Backyard barbecues and merchant sales began taking over for people stopping by the Memorial in town where you all once came to pay your respects.

    Then came that fateful day in 2001, September to be exact, when airplanes were flown into buildings and many people died. We knew our numbers would be growing soon and prepared to greet new arrivals.

    I watched as once again the numbers at Memorial Day ceremonies grew and we gathered there with you, happy to see faces we hadn’t seen in years.

    I wasn’t prepared to greet our son, but he knew who I was right away even though he had never met me. We hugged long and hard, the hug I had wanted to give him so long ago.

    We traveled together as once again; we saw you accepting a folded flag, this time for our son and you placed it alongside of mine.

    We were together that day and every Memorial Day when you, along with his brothers and sisters came to the Veterans Memorial in town to hear the speeches and to say how much you missed us that first couple of years.

    But, you weren’t there last the couple of years. What happened? Did we make you mad? Did the pain of remembering us become too great? Did you listen to those voices screaming out how wrong we were for going or believe them as they said we were the bad guys? We see you at home in your backyard. Grandchildren are there now, along with friends and neighbors and you are laughing, playing games, having fun. Our folded flags have gathered dust and are in a box.

    Have we been forgotten?

    There are so few of you that still come. We hear far too few words of thanks any more. We are happy that you can enjoy life and we miss being there with you, enjoying it too.

    Our Memorials are being vandalized, stolen and neglected. Many have fallen into disrepair, so few stopping by today. Our Memorials are under assault and Courts are deciding to tear them down, falsely claiming them to be religious symbols and you aren’t speaking out.

    We miss you and think of you every day. We know what the price of freedom is as we paid the high price and would gladly do it again.

    We remember you. Don’t you remember us?

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com