Daily Archives: October 7, 2009

America’s Cross to Bear: SCOTUS Hears Arguments on Mojave Desert Veterans Memorial Cross

Will America’s religious symbols be scrubbed from the public square? An Oregon man is offended by the cross in the middle of the California desert, so he, with his taxpayer paid ACLU attorneys, sued to get rid of it. A lower court ordered the memorial cross be covered up. Today the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the case to save the memorial cross—and potentially thousands of others like it.
Are you ‘offended?’
Besides blogging on this case before (Here, here and here), Rees Lloyd has co written a piece on the issue for Town Hall here.
Here’s an excerpt from that piece on what the issue is:

The object at the center of the case is a small, unadorned cross sitting in a remote part of the Mojave Desert Preserve in Southeast California. A veterans’ group erected this memorial cross on private land in 1934 to honor the dead of all wars.
Military memorials commonly use the cross as part of a display to honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice to defend our nation. While the cross is a religious symbol, the military has also used it as a symbol of courage, sacrifice, and honor. For example, the nation’s second highest military award is the Distinguished Service Cross. Visitors to the hallowed grounds of Arlington National Cemetery can see several commemorative crosses, like the Canadian Cross of Sacrifice, a gift from former Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King that was dedicated at Arlington in 1927.
If the Supreme Court does not overturn the appeals court, religious symbols that have graced monuments for many decades may become a thing of the past. Memorials to military veterans, police officers, firefighters, and other heroes will be whitewashed, covered up, or torn out to appease the politically correct agenda of intolerant extremists

Embedded video from CNN Video

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

America’s Cross to Bear: SCOTUS Hears Arguments on Mojave Desert Veterans Memorial Cross

Will America’s religious symbols be scrubbed from the public square? An Oregon man is offended by the cross in the middle of the California desert, so he, with his taxpayer paid ACLU attorneys, sued to get rid of it. A lower court ordered the memorial cross be covered up. Today the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the case to save the memorial cross—and potentially thousands of others like it.
Are you ‘offended?’
Besides blogging on this case before (Here, here and here), Rees Lloyd has co written a piece on the issue for Town Hall here.
Here’s an excerpt from that piece on what the issue is:

The object at the center of the case is a small, unadorned cross sitting in a remote part of the Mojave Desert Preserve in Southeast California. A veterans’ group erected this memorial cross on private land in 1934 to honor the dead of all wars.
Military memorials commonly use the cross as part of a display to honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice to defend our nation. While the cross is a religious symbol, the military has also used it as a symbol of courage, sacrifice, and honor. For example, the nation’s second highest military award is the Distinguished Service Cross. Visitors to the hallowed grounds of Arlington National Cemetery can see several commemorative crosses, like the Canadian Cross of Sacrifice, a gift from former Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King that was dedicated at Arlington in 1927.
If the Supreme Court does not overturn the appeals court, religious symbols that have graced monuments for many decades may become a thing of the past. Memorials to military veterans, police officers, firefighters, and other heroes will be whitewashed, covered up, or torn out to appease the politically correct agenda of intolerant extremists

Embedded video from CNN Video

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Microsoft gives $100K to Wash. gay-partners effort

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Microsoft Corp. has donated $100,000 to the campaign supporting more partnership rights for Washington state gay couples.

That’s the largest single donation in favor of Referendum 71, which asks voters to approve or reject a new law that expands domestic partnerships for gay and lesbian couples.

A no vote on R-71 will deny SB 5688, the falsely named “everything but marriage” bill. As admitted by the author, Democrat Senator Ed Murray, SB 5688 is but an incremental step into same sex marriage being legalized in Washington State.

More here and here

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com