Daily Archives: November 21, 2007

Congratulations! Now Keep the Pressure on to DO IT RIGHT!

FROM KATU:

PORTLAND, Ore. – Neither North Interstate Avenue nor Southwest Fourth Avenue in Portland will be renamed Cesar Chavez Boulevard, the City Council decided Wednesday morning.

Instead the Council voted to table any decision on naming a street after Chavez, the late labor rights leader. And they are not going to make any decision on where to honor Chavez at this time.

“The decision was what we asked for,” said Multnomah County Commissioner Maria Rojo de Steffey. “The Chinese-American community and the Hispanic community both asked that the City Council withdraw or table the Fourth Avenue recommendation and vote on the Interstate (proposal). They did that today.”

Mayor Tom Potter and the Council agreed everyone in the city needed time to heal from the whole re-naming process, which garnered plenty of criticism and outcry.

It started when a local Latino group approached businesses and the mayor’s office this summer to ask for their support to re-name north Portland’s Interstate Avenue after Chavez. But the idea riled many, especially some business owners who claimed the change would possibly cost them thousands to change their business names, letterhead, advertisements and other facets of their business identities.

The issue got so heated that Mayor Potter walked out on a City Council meeting when it appeared a vote would be delayed on the issue.

Last week, in an unexpected move, the Council turned to the idea of re-naming Southwest Fourth Avenue in downtown Portland, which runs through the heart of the community’s historic Chinatown area. That choice upset members of the Chinese-American community, who believed the Council made the decision without considering them.

It was unclear Wednesday what is the next step for those who support honoring Chavez in Portland.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Happy Thanksgiving! How the Second Thanksgiving Almost Didn’t Happen

A wonderful piece by John Stossel (here) about how collectivism practiced by the Pilgrims nearly resulted in their starvation until they figured out that man is best equipped to take care of his own land and family.
As Governor John Bradford said,


“So as it well appeared that famine must still ensue the next year also, if not some way prevented,” wrote Gov. William Bradford in his diary. The colonists, he said, “began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery. At length after much debate of things, [I] (with the advice of the chiefest among them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land.” “This had very good success,” Bradford wrote, “for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been. By this time harvest was come, and instead of famine, now God gave them plenty, and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many. “


As Stossel points out, “
What private property does — as the Pilgrims discovered — is connect effort to reward, creating an incentive for people to produce far more. Then, if there’s a free market, people will trade their surpluses to others for the things they lack. Mutual exchange for mutual benefit makes the community richer.”

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Congratulations! Now Keep the Pressure on to DO IT RIGHT!

FROM KATU:

PORTLAND, Ore. – Neither North Interstate Avenue nor Southwest Fourth Avenue in Portland will be renamed Cesar Chavez Boulevard, the City Council decided Wednesday morning.

Instead the Council voted to table any decision on naming a street after Chavez, the late labor rights leader. And they are not going to make any decision on where to honor Chavez at this time.

“The decision was what we asked for,” said Multnomah County Commissioner Maria Rojo de Steffey. “The Chinese-American community and the Hispanic community both asked that the City Council withdraw or table the Fourth Avenue recommendation and vote on the Interstate (proposal). They did that today.”

Mayor Tom Potter and the Council agreed everyone in the city needed time to heal from the whole re-naming process, which garnered plenty of criticism and outcry.

It started when a local Latino group approached businesses and the mayor’s office this summer to ask for their support to re-name north Portland’s Interstate Avenue after Chavez. But the idea riled many, especially some business owners who claimed the change would possibly cost them thousands to change their business names, letterhead, advertisements and other facets of their business identities.

The issue got so heated that Mayor Potter walked out on a City Council meeting when it appeared a vote would be delayed on the issue.

Last week, in an unexpected move, the Council turned to the idea of re-naming Southwest Fourth Avenue in downtown Portland, which runs through the heart of the community’s historic Chinatown area. That choice upset members of the Chinese-American community, who believed the Council made the decision without considering them.

It was unclear Wednesday what is the next step for those who support honoring Chavez in Portland.

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

Happy Thanksgiving! How the Second Thanksgiving Almost Didn’t Happen

A wonderful piece by John Stossel (here) about how collectivism practiced by the Pilgrims nearly resulted in their starvation until they figured out that man is best equipped to take care of his own land and family.
As Governor John Bradford said,


“So as it well appeared that famine must still ensue the next year also, if not some way prevented,” wrote Gov. William Bradford in his diary. The colonists, he said, “began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery. At length after much debate of things, [I] (with the advice of the chiefest among them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land.” “This had very good success,” Bradford wrote, “for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been. By this time harvest was come, and instead of famine, now God gave them plenty, and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many. “


As Stossel points out, “
What private property does — as the Pilgrims discovered — is connect effort to reward, creating an incentive for people to produce far more. Then, if there’s a free market, people will trade their surpluses to others for the things they lack. Mutual exchange for mutual benefit makes the community richer.”

Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com