Daily Archives: October 3, 2007

If You Disagree that Portland Needs a Cesar Chavez Blvd, Mayor Moonbeam Says You’re "Fearful"

That’s to say that if you oppose Mayor Moonbeam’s plan you must be some kind of racist! That’s basically what the good mayor is saying in this letter having to do with the last public meeting on this issue.

Folks who run businesses on Interstate cum Caesar Chavez have just put up with the Max line extension (against voters’ wishes, btw) and are still reeling business wise from that and now they’re being asked to change their identity to satisfy Mayor Moonbeam’s penchant for tokenism.

The business owners at the last meeting suggested the road dedicated to the union organizer be instead placed in a highly Hispanic area such as Woodburn or Hillsboro (or my suggestion: what about Mt. Angel where the now closed Collegio Caesar Chavez once existed and WHERE HE ACTUALLY VISITED!). That’s not racist, that’s reality.
What do you say? Here’s the letter Potter sent out to the participants at the last meeting. See the actual city ordinance after the letter and ask yourself if this is too soon after the Rosa Parks change.


An open letter to the community about honoring César E. Chávez

(September 26, 2007)

Dear Portlanders:
César E. Chávez’s work was rooted in his belief in peaceful and nonviolent action. Unfortunately, this same legacy of respect was not present last week during a neighborhood discussion of a street commemoration in his name.

As I’ve said before many times: good people can disagree. And many do in this case. The exchange of opinions is healthy for a community to better understand all sides of an issue. But when an opinion is delivered with negativity and disrespect, it is not healthy, it is destructive.

And this should be unacceptable to every Portlander.

Will Rogers once said “you have to go out on a limb sometimes, because that is where the fruit is.” I believe this is an opportunity for Portlanders on all sides to go out on that limb together. Yes, we might still come out disagreeing. But what we might achieve is a more authentic understanding of all the different people, places and things that truly make this City who and what it is today.

I urge all Portlanders to learn more about this project and what it means the Latino community. Take the time to listen – and I mean really listen – before making a fearful reaction to the idea of change. More importantly in this debate, let’s respect one another. For when we do this, we are really saying to one another “I respect your right to be here.”

The Office of Transportation and Office of Neighborhood Involvement have planned two opportunities to learn about this proposal. I urge everyone interested to attend and respectfully share your opinions with the City on this matter.

Community meetings on renaming Interstate Avenue to César E. Chávez Boulevard :

Wednesday, October 3rd

Ockley Green Middle School
6031 N Montana Ave
Portland
, OR 97217
6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, October 9th

Ockley Green Middle School
6031 N Montana Ave
Portland
, OR 97217
6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
If you are unable to attend these meetings, please call my comment line at (503) 823-4127 or email me at mayorpotter@ci.portland.or.us with your opinion.

17.93.010 Criteria For Renaming a City Street.

A. Any individual or organization may apply to the City to rename a City street. City streets may only be renamed after a prominent person. Such prominent person must be:

1. a person who has achieved prominence as a result of his or her significant, positive contribution to the United States of America and/or the local community;

2. a real person; and

3. a person who has been deceased for at least five years.

B. Only one street renaming application shall be processed at a time, and only one street name change shall be implemented per year for a major traffic or district collector street. Additional applications shall be placed on a waiting list and processed in order of submission when this criteria can be met.


Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

If You Disagree that Portland Needs a Cesar Chavez Blvd, Mayor Moonbeam Says You’re "Fearful"

That’s to say that if you oppose Mayor Moonbeam’s plan you must be some kind of racist! That’s basically what the good mayor is saying in this letter having to do with the last public meeting on this issue.

Folks who run businesses on Interstate cum Caesar Chavez have just put up with the Max line extension (against voters’ wishes, btw) and are still reeling business wise from that and now they’re being asked to change their identity to satisfy Mayor Moonbeam’s penchant for tokenism.

The business owners at the last meeting suggested the road dedicated to the union organizer be instead placed in a highly Hispanic area such as Woodburn or Hillsboro (or my suggestion: what about Mt. Angel where the now closed Collegio Caesar Chavez once existed and WHERE HE ACTUALLY VISITED!). That’s not racist, that’s reality.
What do you say? Here’s the letter Potter sent out to the participants at the last meeting. See the actual city ordinance after the letter and ask yourself if this is too soon after the Rosa Parks change.


An open letter to the community about honoring César E. Chávez

(September 26, 2007)

Dear Portlanders:
César E. Chávez’s work was rooted in his belief in peaceful and nonviolent action. Unfortunately, this same legacy of respect was not present last week during a neighborhood discussion of a street commemoration in his name.

As I’ve said before many times: good people can disagree. And many do in this case. The exchange of opinions is healthy for a community to better understand all sides of an issue. But when an opinion is delivered with negativity and disrespect, it is not healthy, it is destructive.

And this should be unacceptable to every Portlander.

Will Rogers once said “you have to go out on a limb sometimes, because that is where the fruit is.” I believe this is an opportunity for Portlanders on all sides to go out on that limb together. Yes, we might still come out disagreeing. But what we might achieve is a more authentic understanding of all the different people, places and things that truly make this City who and what it is today.

I urge all Portlanders to learn more about this project and what it means the Latino community. Take the time to listen – and I mean really listen – before making a fearful reaction to the idea of change. More importantly in this debate, let’s respect one another. For when we do this, we are really saying to one another “I respect your right to be here.”

The Office of Transportation and Office of Neighborhood Involvement have planned two opportunities to learn about this proposal. I urge everyone interested to attend and respectfully share your opinions with the City on this matter.

Community meetings on renaming Interstate Avenue to César E. Chávez Boulevard :

Wednesday, October 3rd

Ockley Green Middle School
6031 N Montana Ave
Portland
, OR 97217
6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, October 9th

Ockley Green Middle School
6031 N Montana Ave
Portland
, OR 97217
6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
If you are unable to attend these meetings, please call my comment line at (503) 823-4127 or email me at mayorpotter@ci.portland.or.us with your opinion.

17.93.010 Criteria For Renaming a City Street.

A. Any individual or organization may apply to the City to rename a City street. City streets may only be renamed after a prominent person. Such prominent person must be:

1. a person who has achieved prominence as a result of his or her significant, positive contribution to the United States of America and/or the local community;

2. a real person; and

3. a person who has been deceased for at least five years.

B. Only one street renaming application shall be processed at a time, and only one street name change shall be implemented per year for a major traffic or district collector street. Additional applications shall be placed on a waiting list and processed in order of submission when this criteria can be met.


Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com