Monthly Archives: July 2007

Over and Out: Ward Churchill

From the Rocky Mountain News:
The University of Colorado Board of Regents on Tuesday fired Ward Churchill, the professor whose remarks likening some Sept. 11 victims to Nazi Adolf Eichmann provoked national outrage and led to an investigation of research misconduct.
Churchill vowed to sue after the 8-1 vote was announced, saying: “New game, new game.

Behind the move to dismiss Ward Churchill are questions about the accuracy and integrity of his scholarly works. Findings of a faculty investigative committee released last year:

  • Historical facts: Churchill manufactured events in which European Americans intentionally spread smallpox to kill Indians. In one such event, the Army is said to have distributed tainted blankets to Mandan Indians. But no evidence backs the claim.

    Elsewhere, Churchill claimed the United States adopted a formal racial code to identify Indians, similar to the code used by the Nazis to identify Jews. U.S. law includes no such code, legal scholars say.

  • Plagiarism: Churchill published an essay on water issues in Canada that closely resembles a pamphlet by a Canadian environmental group. He also borrowed a work on fishing rights originally published by Canadian scholar Fay Cohen.
  • Falsifying sources: Churchill wrote essays under the names of other people, which he then cited as independent sources in his footnotes.

    The investigative panel described the charges as serious.


  • Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Is This Generation Better Than the Boomers?

    Yes, accoding to a piece in the Weekly Standard. They answered the call to fight for liberty instead of tuning out and turning on.

    n the 1960s, history called the Baby Boomers. They didn’t answer the phone.

    Confronted with a generation-defining conflict, the cold war, the Boomers–those, at any rate, who came to be emblematic of their generation–took the opposite path from their parents during World War II. Sadly, the excesses of Woodstock became the face of the Boomers’ response to their moment of challenge. War protests where agitated youths derided American soldiers as baby-killers added no luster to their image.

    Few of the leading lights of that generation joined the military. Most calculated how they could avoid military service, and their attitude rippled through the rest of the century. In the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s, military service didn’t occur to most young people as an option, let alone a duty.

    But now, once again, history is calling. Fortunately, the present generation appears more reminiscent of their grandparents than their parents.

    Read the rest here.

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Is This Generation Better Than the Boomers?

    Yes, accoding to a piece in the Weekly Standard. They answered the call to fight for liberty instead of tuning out and turning on.

    n the 1960s, history called the Baby Boomers. They didn’t answer the phone.

    Confronted with a generation-defining conflict, the cold war, the Boomers–those, at any rate, who came to be emblematic of their generation–took the opposite path from their parents during World War II. Sadly, the excesses of Woodstock became the face of the Boomers’ response to their moment of challenge. War protests where agitated youths derided American soldiers as baby-killers added no luster to their image.

    Few of the leading lights of that generation joined the military. Most calculated how they could avoid military service, and their attitude rippled through the rest of the century. In the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s, military service didn’t occur to most young people as an option, let alone a duty.

    But now, once again, history is calling. Fortunately, the present generation appears more reminiscent of their grandparents than their parents.

    Read the rest here.

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Planning Poohbahs Propose Moving Sauvie Island Bridge to the Pearl –but Just for Bikes and Peds

    I don’t know for sure if this is the Portland Business Journal’s annual joke edition or not. Could someone please tell me if this story is for real? The content seems like it’s a parody of the so called “sustainability” * mindset.
    *sustainability: whatever that means

    Pearl wants Sauvie Bridge

    Sauvie Island Bridge may find new life as a bike/pedestrian span
    Portland Business Journal – July 20, 2007
    by Andy Giegerich
    Taking sustainability to drastic new levels, the city of Portland wants to spend $5 million to move the Sauvie Island Bridge to the Pearl District. That’s twice the cost it would take to build a new bridge in the Pearl altogether.
    The neighbors and the city aim to create an Interstate 405 overpass connecting the Pearl and the Northwest 23rd Avenue area at Northwest Flanders Street. Once installed, the structure would limit its traffic to bicycles and pedestrians, serving as the centerpiece of a proposed Flanders Street “bike boulevard.”

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Planning Poohbahs Propose Moving Sauvie Island Bridge to the Pearl –but Just for Bikes and Peds

    I don’t know for sure if this is the Portland Business Journal’s annual joke edition or not. Could someone please tell me if this story is for real? The content seems like it’s a parody of the so called “sustainability” * mindset.
    *sustainability: whatever that means

    Pearl wants Sauvie Bridge

    Sauvie Island Bridge may find new life as a bike/pedestrian span
    Portland Business Journal – July 20, 2007
    by Andy Giegerich
    Taking sustainability to drastic new levels, the city of Portland wants to spend $5 million to move the Sauvie Island Bridge to the Pearl District. That’s twice the cost it would take to build a new bridge in the Pearl altogether.
    The neighbors and the city aim to create an Interstate 405 overpass connecting the Pearl and the Northwest 23rd Avenue area at Northwest Flanders Street. Once installed, the structure would limit its traffic to bicycles and pedestrians, serving as the centerpiece of a proposed Flanders Street “bike boulevard.”

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Oregon Planning Poohbahs Mystified by Free Market Successes

    From the spectacular success of Bridgeport to the “gridlock” expected at the IKEA store, the planning class is called out as ineffectual in two stories (here and here) in the Zero today.
    As well they should.

    Buried in section D in the Zero today, the Bridgeport Village success is recounted by the reporter puncuated in a story with a variety of sniffs from a couple central planning acolytes. Why turn up their nose at one of the most elegant and happening places to be in the area? Not enough high density, affordable housing. Planning Czars and Czarinas now believe that Bridgeport needs to be REDESIGNATED as a regional shopping center in order to force upon developers high density housing and to attract mass transit (apparently buses don’t count). If you play with the planners they throw federal dollars at developers; that’s the carrot.

    The rub is that a developer is already planning high density apartments within a mile of the place—and he didn’t need to be paid off.

    Like the situation at Bandon Dunes, it looks as if planners want to go back, reclassify a privately planned and developed area and claim the job creation, transportation “successes” (when they lay the train tracks somewhere around there) and the high density planning as their planning success. Plus they’ll throw money at them.
    Why don’t you guys save the tax dollars and just stay out of it?
    The other story is the one about IKEA. It’s a well known story. Central planners planned a high density center and even gave away taxpayer land, rights of way, and money to Bechtel to do it in exchange for a light rail contract. Part of the deal, of course, was that big box stores were not allowed. No WalMart. No Costco. Nuttin, honey. But the location, lack of planned parking and other “amenities” were so antithetical to making money in that crummy location that nobody came to the party. IKEA made a pitch, and, the planning poohbahs, elected officials, et al looked the other way, removed some of their mandates and said ok. Now we have Randy Leonard complaining about their sign. Gads.
    IKEA has been trying to get into the Portland market for awhile. Costco wants to expand as does WalMart.
    Planners: you have “Peter Principled” your way out of your relevance.
    Bonus question for Walmart haters: From what countries are most of the items in IKEA imported?
    China and Poland.
    For extra credit check out the story about Portland’s “Smart” Growth by the Cato Institute here. It’s great reading.

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Oregon Planning Poohbahs Mystified by Free Market Successes

    From the spectacular success of Bridgeport to the “gridlock” expected at the IKEA store, the planning class is called out as ineffectual in two stories (here and here) in the Zero today.
    As well they should.

    Buried in section D in the Zero today, the Bridgeport Village success is recounted by the reporter puncuated in a story with a variety of sniffs from a couple central planning acolytes. Why turn up their nose at one of the most elegant and happening places to be in the area? Not enough high density, affordable housing. Planning Czars and Czarinas now believe that Bridgeport needs to be REDESIGNATED as a regional shopping center in order to force upon developers high density housing and to attract mass transit (apparently buses don’t count). If you play with the planners they throw federal dollars at developers; that’s the carrot.

    The rub is that a developer is already planning high density apartments within a mile of the place—and he didn’t need to be paid off.

    Like the situation at Bandon Dunes, it looks as if planners want to go back, reclassify a privately planned and developed area and claim the job creation, transportation “successes” (when they lay the train tracks somewhere around there) and the high density planning as their planning success. Plus they’ll throw money at them.
    Why don’t you guys save the tax dollars and just stay out of it?
    The other story is the one about IKEA. It’s a well known story. Central planners planned a high density center and even gave away taxpayer land, rights of way, and money to Bechtel to do it in exchange for a light rail contract. Part of the deal, of course, was that big box stores were not allowed. No WalMart. No Costco. Nuttin, honey. But the location, lack of planned parking and other “amenities” were so antithetical to making money in that crummy location that nobody came to the party. IKEA made a pitch, and, the planning poohbahs, elected officials, et al looked the other way, removed some of their mandates and said ok. Now we have Randy Leonard complaining about their sign. Gads.
    IKEA has been trying to get into the Portland market for awhile. Costco wants to expand as does WalMart.
    Planners: you have “Peter Principled” your way out of your relevance.
    Bonus question for Walmart haters: From what countries are most of the items in IKEA imported?
    China and Poland.
    For extra credit check out the story about Portland’s “Smart” Growth by the Cato Institute here. It’s great reading.

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Monday Question: Why Do Liberals Hate Rich People?

    Oh, sure, I know there are a lot of rich liberals but why do they play the class envy card when it comes to public policy?
    State big brains are talking about tax changes which might include a switch from property tax to sales tax unless you own more than $5 mil worth of property and then you get stuck with both.

    Between this idea and the M 37 so called “fix” it seems as if Oregon liberals are trying to make it as unattractive as possible to amass land or even keep the stuff you had and had designs on developing at some point. Large lots are discouraged.
    Is it because they think it unseemly to own that much land or is it because they want more control over private property–or is it both?

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    You Heard it Here First (Again): Will Wyden Now go After Big Grocery?

    Ethanol is creating higher prices for groceries part two:

    What’s the connection between ethanol, the biofuel produced from corn, and a cherry vanilla ice-cream?

    Answer: the first is responsible for pushing up the price of the other.

    This month, the price of milk in the United States surged to a near-record in part because of the increasing costs of feeding a dairy herd. The corn feed used to feed cattle has almost doubled in price in a year as demand has grown for the grain to produce ethanol.

    The rest of the story here.

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Jim Webb Cheapshot

    Just because their opposition to the war is political in nature and has nothing to do with national security, doesn’t mean you attribute Lindsay Graham’s comments to politics. Obviously, after reading the polls Graham’s comments are clearly less “political” in nature. Webb’s been outed as a cheap shot artist and a phony.

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Necessity? Meet Invention. Bonus: OFIR a "Restrictionist" Group

    Interesting story in the Zero this morning about a new piece of equipment that would pick wine grapes in record time without scores of field workers. Strangely, the story is not so much a laudatory tale about man’s mastery over nature or necessity being the mother of invention or streamlining an old fashioned business. No this story is cautionary and borderline sad (not to mention pedantic on the part of the reporter). Why? Because this piece of machinery will put some ILLEGAL aliens out of business.
    Plus, as a bonus part of the story, Oregonians for Immigration Reform is described as a “restrictionist” group. Wow, being against illegal behavior is now ‘restrictionist.’ Imagine being a group opposing drinking and driving, for instance. Would MADD ever be referred to as a “restrictionist group” because they wanted to enforce the laws against drinking and driving?
    The following is an excerpt from the story and a picture of the new wine grape picker.

    Suddenly, vineyard owners were calling Capps to schedule demonstrations, saying they couldn’t cope with worsening worker shortages — or immigration raids. Their concerns were heightened after a U.S. Senate immigration bill that would have offered legal status for up to 900,000 undocumented agricultural workers failed, and immigration officers detained nearly 200 workers at a Portland produce processing plant.

    Oregonians for Immigration Reform, a restrictionist group, touted the European machine as a beacon of a future without illegal labor.

    “As soon as word about this got out, the immigration issue was the first thing that came up,” Capps said. “The bloggers are all over it. They’re saying, ‘Finally, see? We told you that you could get by without all this immigration.’ “

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com

    Monday Question: Why Do Liberals Hate Rich People?

    Oh, sure, I know there are a lot of rich liberals but why do they play the class envy card when it comes to public policy?
    State big brains are talking about tax changes which might include a switch from property tax to sales tax unless you own more than $5 mil worth of property and then you get stuck with both.

    Between this idea and the M 37 so called “fix” it seems as if Oregon liberals are trying to make it as unattractive as possible to amass land or even keep the stuff you had and had designs on developing at some point. Large lots are discouraged.
    Is it because they think it unseemly to own that much land or is it because they want more control over private property–or is it both?

    Tell ’em where you saw it. Http://www.victoriataft.com